Buckwheat Pancakes (Inspired by The Long Winter)

Buckwheat Pancakes

By Katie Mae, of Nourishing Simplicity

Fluffy buckwheat pancakes dripping with butter and brown sugar syrup are the perfect winter breakfast.

The Little House Books by Laura Ingalls Wilder are near and dear to my heart. My mom had read the series twice through to us by the time I was eight and I read them as my first “big books” when I was nine. To this day they are my favourite children’s series.

I love the stories Laura wove of her family’s adventures and trials as pioneers, making their stamp in history.

I am and always have been drawn to the passages about the food they prepared. The stories are a traditional foodie’s dream as they transport you back to a day when it was common knowledge that cows should eat grass that produces rich yellow cream, that freshly rendered lard should a kitchen staple, and that white sugar is only for special treats.

Over the years, I have created many recipes inspired by Laura’s famous classics such as lemonade, sourdough biscuits, and corn meal mush. One I recently added to my repertoire is buckwheat pancakes. Buckwheat pancakes were a meal that Laura’s future husband Almanzo and his brother Royal served Pa when he braved the bitter cold in the book “The Long Winter” to buy wheat for his starving family.

Almazno and Royal were eating supper. Almazno had stacked the pancakes with brown sugar and he had made plenty of them. Royal had eaten halfway down his stack, Almonzo was nearing the bottom of his, and one tall stack of two dozen pancakes, dripping melted brown sugar, was standing untouched when Pa knocked at the door.

“Come in, Mr, Ingalls! Sit up and gave some pancakes with us!” Royal invited him.

“You boys certianly live in the lap of luxury,” Pa remarked. The pancakes were no ordinary buckwheat pancakes. Almazno followed his mother’s pancake rule and the cakes were light as foam, soaked through with melted brown sugar”

The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder

I may not know Mother Wilder’s secret but these delightful buckwheat pancakes are still light as foam. The lightness comes from the overnight soaking, and the baking soda interacting with the acid in the yogurt (or other soaking medium).

Buckwheat pancakes have a decided tang that comes from the grain itself. For this recipe, I used  part freshly ground buckwheat and part freshly ground whole wheat flour. You can use only buckwheat for a gluten-free option but the pancakes will not be a light. These are perfect paired withAlmanzo’s favourite fried apples and onions and breakfast sausage.

Fix yourself a plate and dive in while enjoying the warmth of your home, instead of a tiny claim shanty like Laura’s family lived in.

Resources:

(Amazon links are affiliate) 

Buckwheat Pancakes Inspired by The Long Winter

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups buckwheat flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups yogurt/buttermilk/dairy kefir/coconut milk kefir
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons sucanat (or unrefined sweetener of choice)
    1 teaspoons baking soda
    1/2 teaspoons unrefined salt

Directions:

1, In a large mixing bowl combine the two flours, yogurt, and water. Mix thoroughly and cover with a cloth. Allow the batter to set on the counter for 12 to 24 hours.

2. Add the sucanat, eggs, baking soda, and salt to the batter. Mix until smooth.

3. Heat a large skillet (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Pour the batter on the skillet to create the size pancakes desired.

4. Allow the cakes to cook for about two minutes or until bubbles form over the cake. Flip the cake and cook on the other side for about one minute.

5. Repeat until all the batter has been used.

For The Love of Food and Books- Buckwheat Pancakes Inspired by The Long Winter
 
Author:
 
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups buckwheat flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups yogurt/buttermilk/dairy kefir/coconut milk kefir
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 TBS sucanat
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp unrefined salt
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl combine the two flours, yogurt, and water. Mix thoroughly and cover with a cloth. Allow the batter to set on the counter for 12 to 24 hours.
  2. Add the sucanat, eggs, baking soda, and salt to the batter. Mix until smooth.
  3. Heat a large skillet (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Pour the batter on the skillet to create the size pancakes desired.
  4. Allow the cakes to cook for about two minutes or until bubbles form over the cake. Flip the cake and cook on the other side for about one minute.
  5. Repeat until all the batter has been used.

 

Instant Chai Latte Powder- A great DIY gift (dairy-free option)

DIY Healthy Chai Latte Powder - Lovely to hand on hand for afternoon tea times, or makes a great gift! -- The Nourishing Gourmet

This creamy, foamy, hot beverage epitomizes pleasure for many tea drinkers. Even those who enjoy coffee have a hard time resisting the sweet comforting spices, ones we smell first and then savor as we taste them. During the holidays the incense and flavors of chai are even more nostalgic and pleasing: the familiar flavor of cinnamon, the healthy bite of ginger, the peppery quality of allspice, and the earthy excitement of cloves, the subtle exotic presence of cardamom, and the pungent, almost bitter flavor of nutmeg.

We’ve all seen instant chai powder at the grocery market. But most instant drink powders contain refined sugar, hydrogenated oils and overall, less than healthful ingredients. These are unnecessary. Whole foods, full of nutrition + a spice or coffee grinder quickly makes this dreamy, creamy drink into a real food reality!

One main difference? There will be settling with this real tea version. If you wish to avoid this, simply steep the drink for 3-5 minutes, once blended; then pour through a strainer into your cup.

DIY Healthy Chai Latte Powder - Lovely to hand on hand for afternoon tea times, or makes a great gift! -- The Nourishing Gourmet

NOTES ON INGREDIENTS:

There are two approaches to this recipe: either buying a high-quality mix of bulk chai spices or measuring them out individually. Both create pretty much the same outcome, although whole spices ground fresh are more flavorful. The choice depends on your preferred sourcing.

For example, Mountain Rose Herbs has an excellent chai blend. If you like ordering from them, their mixture works perfectly for this recipe. You can also order through our affiliate Amazon this Frontier Organic and Fair Trade Chai blend . One recipe option uses this measurement.

However, if you have most of what you need already, and you only need a couple more spices to get started, I give the quantities below for measuring the spices separately.

This recipe can be made with whichever milk you like best. Instead of using powdered milk, as most factory-made chai latte blends do, this recipe uses milk instead of water to create your latte. Choose raw milk, goat milk, coconut milk, nut milk, whatever suits your diet. All will work well and taste great.

Regarding the tea, you can also choose which tea suits you best: black tea, decaffeinated tea, or red rooibos. All blend beautifully in the spice grinder, creating this instant tea delight!

NOTES ON EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

I tried out few spice grinders before landing on (affiliate) my favorite . If you have a coffee grinder at home, it is likely the only tool you’ll need. The recipe requires a fine powder. I purchased my grinder just for this recipe and am excited to have it from this point forward, finally a spice grinder in my very own kitchen! If you don’t have one yet, they are inexpensive and effective, so nice to have on hand.

INSTANT CHAI LATTE POWDER
Makes approximately 1-1/2 cups powder or 8-16 oz. servings of Chai Latte
Recipe can be doubled

  • 2/3 cup loose black tea or rooibos (this will measure out to slightly less than 1/2 cup tea powder, once blended in spice grinder)
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar (or substitute granulated sweetener of choice; or add honey to taste at the time of serving)
  • 1/2 cup collagen or gelatin (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons whole spice chai blend
    -OR-
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon each: allspice, cardamom, cloves, and nutmeg (these spices can be measured once powdered)
  1. Place 12 oz. hot milk of choice and 1 tablespoon Instant Chai into a blender.
  2. Blend 12 seconds on medium speed. Serve and enjoy.

Bulletproof Variation- Use hot water and 2 tablespoons butter or coconut oil, in place of hot milk.
Iced Latte Variation- In warmer months, use collagen instead of gelatin. Blend cold milk with spices. Pour, strained, over ice.

Instant Chai Latte Powder
 
 
Ingredients
  • Makes approximately 1-1/2 cups powder or 8-16 oz. servings of Chai Latte
  • Recipe can be doubled
  • ⅔ cup loose black tea or rooibos (this will measure out to slightly less than ½ cup tea powder, once blended in spice grinder)
  • ½ cup coconut sugar (or substitute granulated sweetener of choice; or add honey to taste at the time of serving)
  • ½ cup collagen or gelatin (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons whole spice chai blend
  • -OR-
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon each: allspice, cardamom, cloves, and nutmeg (these spices can be measured once powdered)
Instructions
  1. Place 12 oz. hot milk of choice and 1 tablespoon Instant Chai into a blender.
  2. Blend 12 seconds on medium speed.
  3. Serve and enjoy.

 

 

 

Paleo Meat and Veggie Muffins

Good for both breakfast and snaking. These delicious grain free savory  muffins are protein-rich, nut-free, and amazing in flavor!  -- The Nourishing Gourmet

By Megan, from Eat Beautiful

These protein-rich, savory muffins are studded with delicious vegetables and make an excellent breakfast or snack. They don’t contain almonds or almond products, and can be made nut-free with the use of sunflower seeds. So many Paleo or GAPS-friendly baked goods contain almonds or almond flour, so I’d like to share a recipe with you that doesn’t.

There is a glut of almond flour recipes in the Paleo baking community and while they are delicious they are also high in omega-6s, which already inundate the standard American diet. Additionally, most commercial almond products (meal, blanched meal, flour and butter) are not sprouted. In my opinion, all nuts and seeds should be sprouted before consumption for digestibility, and mineral absorption.

What about a muffin that has no flour at all? Truly Paleolithic in spirit, and even healing in its gentleness and nutrient profile, a muffin of meat, soaked seeds, eggs, veggies and fat is in order!

Soaked pine nuts are the secret ingredient in these lunch-inspired savory treats! The pine nuts do not, however, need to be dehydrated. They soak overnight in salt water (this takes less than 5 minutes, including their morning rinsing) and then get pureed right into the muffin batter. Easy.

For a more economical version, raw sunflower seeds are used.

The Sausage and Egg Muffin is also full of grated veggies. So you’re getting a walloping dose of goodness, a meal, in the form of a delicious handheld snack. I make a batch of these and freeze them. Then I alternate putting them, or leftovers from dinner, in my daughter’s daily lunches. She loves them and they look “normal” to her friends who do not eat Paleo diets. (That’s helpful when you’re 14.)

These are also great for road trips, or whenever you’re overly hungry but have no time to make a quality meal. They defrost beautifully in a toaster oven, straight from the freezer.

We love them plain. We also love to break them in half and top the halves with slices of butter or cheese.

You may notice; the recipe indicates the muffins are baking soda-free. For those on healing diets, such as GAPS, this plays in. Baking soda makes the stomach less acidic. Having an acidic belly is important in terms of triggering the digestive mechanisms to secrete digestive juices. (I even take a supplement called Betaine HCl with Pepsin that adds more acid to my stomach.) The muffins rise beautifully and stay their risen selves without the leavening agent.

Try these nourishing, protein-packed muffins that offer nothing but good stuff to give you energy toward wellness!

By the way, this recipe comes from my cookbook; and it’s one we make in our Paleo café. If you enjoy this recipe and approach to grain-free baking, check out my cookbook where you’ll find lots more treats that are customer-approved and genuinely healthy! My cookbook is Eat Beautiful: Grain-free, Sugar-free and Loving It and can be purchased as an eCookbook or in softcover from Amazon.

Cheers, friends! Enjoy.

Good for both breakfast and snaking. These delicious grain free savory  muffins are protein-rich, nut-free, and amazing in flavor!  -- The Nourishing GourmetSavory Meat and Veggie Muffins, aka Sausage and Egg Muffins

(nut-free, dairy-free, baking soda-free)

Intentionally GAPS-friendly, these muffins are an easy meal in your hand. Accompanied by a mug or Thermos of bone broth, they make the diet easier when you need to be away from home. Make a bundle of them and keep them in the freezer, easy to grab on the go. They also are free of baking soda, an added GAPS bonus, for a healing and satisfying food.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup soaked raw pine nuts, wet* (see how-to below), or sunflower seeds (for a more economical option)
  • 1 cup zucchini or carrots, grated, or a combination of both
  • 1 cup cooked ground beef or other ground meat (ideally cooked up with a little sea salt, 1/2 teaspoon per 1 pound meat)
  • 6 eggs, preferably pastured
  • 1/2 cup olive oil, coconut oil, ghee or rendered animal fat, melted and cooled
  • 1/3 cup coconut flour or chia seeds
  • 1 dried teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon powdered stevia (or 10 to 15 drops liquid stevia — NuNaturals brand preferred) or 2 tsp. honey

Yields 6 large or 12 small-size muffins.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.

Directions:

  1. Prepare 6 extra-large muffin cups or 12 medium-size muffin cups by lining them with cut squares of parchment paper. (Or use good-quality muffin cup liners that won’t stick.)
  2. Place the pine nuts, eggs, oil, coconut flour, oregano, sea salt and stevia into the blender.
  3. Puree the ingredients until they are smooth, about 30 to 45 seconds.
  4. Fold in zucchini or carrots and meat.
  5. Pour the muffin batter into the prepared tin and bake until they are puffed, golden and a knife inserted into the center of one comes out clean — about 25 minutes.

Variations:

  • Substitute grated apple and bulk pork for the zucchini and beef. Substitute 1/4 teaspoon allspice and 1/2 teaspoon sage for the oregano.
  • For added protein, use the full 1 pound of cooked ground meat, folding it into the batter as described. This version turns out great.

*How to soak raw seeds- For every 4 cups raw seeds, cover by two inches with room-temperature filtered water and 2 teaspoons sea salt. Stir well to dissolve the salt. Leave uncovered at room temperature overnight, then drain and rinse well in the morning. They are now ready to be used in their wet form.

Paleo Meat and Veggie Muffins
 
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup soaked raw pine nuts, wet* (see how-to below), or sunflower seeds (for a more economical option)
  • 1 cup zucchini or carrots, grated, or a combination of both
  • 1 cup cooked ground beef or other ground meat (ideally cooked up with a little sea salt, ½ teaspoon per 1 pound meat)
  • 6 eggs, preferably pastured
  • ½ cup olive oil, coconut oil, ghee or rendered animal fat, melted and cooled
  • ⅓ cup coconut flour or chia seeds
  • 1 dried teaspoon oregano
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon powdered stevia (or 10 to 15 drops liquid stevia — NuNaturals brand preferred) or 2 tsp. honey
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare 6 extra-large muffin cups or 12 medium-size muffin cups by lining them with cut squares of parchment paper. (Or use good-quality muffin cup liners that won’t stick.)
  2. Place the pine nuts, eggs, oil, coconut flour, oregano, sea salt and stevia into the blender.
  3. Puree the ingredients until they are smooth, about 30 to 45 seconds.
  4. Fold in zucchini or carrots and meat.
  5. Pour the muffin batter into the prepared tin and bake until they are puffed, golden and a knife inserted into the center of one comes out clean — about 25 minutes.
Notes
Substitute grated apple and bulk pork for the zucchini and beef. Substitute ¼ teaspoon allspice and ½ teaspoon sage for the oregano.
For added protein, use the full 1 pound of cooked ground meat, folding it into the batter as described. This version turns out great.

*How to soak raw seeds- For every 4 cups raw seeds, cover by two inches with room-temperature filtered water and 2 teaspoons sea salt. Stir well to dissolve the salt. Leave uncovered at room temperature overnight, then drain and rinse well in the morning. They are now ready to be used in their wet form.

 

5 Surprising Ways to Eat Your Vegetables at Breakfast

Why not start the day right with these delicious breakfast recipes that include vegetables? They are kid-friendly too! This wonderful post is a guest post from my friend, Katie, at Kitchen Stewardship. If you haven’t already, check out her wonderful blog! I love her honesty-at-all-costs writing integrity, and how practical and relatable she is as a person. And check out her awesome (and honest and practical) eBooks! I’m proud to be one of her affiliates. — Kimi 

It’s easy to add some carrots and dip to dinner and make veggies a priority, but breakfast can be a tricky one.

Whether you believe that the government’s “My Plate” or old “food pyramid” demonstrate the best way to eat or not (Me? Not. All those grains? Oy yi yi…), not many people will argue that shooting for “5 a day” when it comes to vegetables isn’t a bad goal.

That many servings can be hard to hit for busy families, especially if young children are a bit picky when it comes to veggie-laden soups, stir fries, or steamed broccoli.

Why not get off on the right foot at breakfast?

And I’m not talking about just tossing some peppers and onions into your eggs (my kids pick those out anyway) or making a green smoothie (although nothing wrong with that).

Here are 5 ways to get a serving or two of vegetables into your family before they even leave the house for the day, without fighting about green things on the plate (or in the glass).

1. Grain-free pumpkin pancakes

Pumpkin Pancake Recipe - one of five ways to include vegetable in your breakfast! Check out the link for this recipe and four more! -- The Nourishing Gourmet

 

That’s a bit mis-leading – these aren’t always grain-free pancakes, but they’re about the most versatile recipe I’ve ever met.

They work with wheat flour, brown rice flour (gluten-free), almond or coconut flour (grain-free), and even sourdough. Make them however you like, and celebrate the fact that for each ¼ cup or less of flour, there’s a full cup of pureed orange vegetables: squash, sweet potatoes, or pumpkin.

They’re yummy enough to eat with or without syrup and sturdy enough to make into nut-butter-pancake-sandwiches for packed lunches the next day. More nourishing lunch ideas in The Healthy Lunch Boxuse the code GOURMET for 30% off.

We make a quadruple batch once a week and usually run out of fall squash that I’ve frozen by the end of May. Did I mention that’s 4 cups of veggies plus nourishing eggs for breakfast? Rock on. Grab the recipe for grain-free pumpkin pancakes HERE.

Time-saving Tip: Bake 1-3 squash while you’re making dinner and already in the kitchen. Scoop out all the flesh into one huge bowl and whiz with an immersion blender to make puree, then freeze some in 2, 3 or 4-cup portions for future batches. Refrigerate what you want for this recipe overnight and use that big bowl for your pancakes in the morning.

2. Chocomole

Chocolate avocado pudding

Simple Chocomole recipe: Wake up your food processor when your coffee maker ticks on and make a simple pudding with 1 avocado, ¼ cup cocoa powder and ¼ cup raw honey.

Looks like chocolate pudding, tastes like chocolate pudding…but kids are eating vegetables full of healthy monounsaturated fats. Add a banana for a different twist, like Kristin’s version of Chocolate Avocado Pudding (pictured above)

This breakfast pairs great with your favorite green smoothie, especially if you’re dairy-free and don’t include fats like whole milk or yogurt in your smoothies. The avocado offers a nice balance to the fruit sugars in smoothies.

Time-saving Tip: Make a chocolate-y recipe in your food processor after breakfast without washing it – like the black bean brownies in The Everything Beans Book or the Peppermint Coconut Bark in Smart Sweets.

3. Sweet potatoes and greens with an egg on top

Delicious breakfast crepe with lots of flavor and healthy vegetables for a yummy start to the day. Check out the link for 4 other recipe ideas for including vegetables at breakfast!

Don’t hate me for including some straight up greens.

This idea might be adults-only in your house (pat yourself on the back right now if your little ones eat greens without a word! I’m impressed!). I love the synergy between sweet potatoes, greens and eggs so much that I just have to share it.

Peel and slice a cooked sweet potato and saute that with any leafy green. Swiss chard is particularly delicious this way – be sure to chop the stem separately and saute it first, preferably in bacon grease or beef tallow!

Soft fry an egg next to it or crack one right on top and put the lid on your pan until the egg is firm on the bottom but runny on the inside. Let all that golden gooey-ness run on your greens on the plate and dig in! (If you want to make it really special, serve it in a crepe like I’ve pictured above!)

Time-saving Tip: The way to make this work for breakfast (i.e. FAST) is to bake some sweet potatoes during dinner prep – toss a few in anytime the oven is on for something else.

4. Breakfast Burritos Deluxe

Breakfast Burritos are one great way to add healthy protein and vegetables to your breakfast! Get four other great ideas for adding vegetables to breakfast here.

I’m back to being realistic for kids – you know how if you chop up vegetables in your kids’ eggs you end up watching them pick the veggies right back out? That’s the way it flies at my house, where my kids are generally excellent eaters with rather mature palates.

But if I dress them up just a little bit more…

Wrap eggs with sauteed veggies in a tortilla and add cheese and salsa, and they think you’ve brought McDonald’s into your kitchen.

I recommend homemade tortillas, simply because I haven’t found ones that are both affordable and don’t use scary fats. Purchased corn tortillas are more likely to be on the clean side, but corn can be another issue entirely…

Time-saving Tip: You can keep peppers, onions, zucchini, and greens all chopped and handy in your freezer, no blanching required (although recommended for greens).

5. Veggie Latkes

Vegetable Pancakes are a tasty way to get vegetables in! Even kids love them. Go to post for 4 more great ideas for including vegetables in your breakfast.

These little cakes aren’t traditional latkes, so don’t yell at me for misusing the word, but “shredded vegetable cakes” will likely not go over so well with the fam.

My family has always served “potato pancakes” made with white potatoes, but those aren’t exactly the most nutrient-dense veggies out there.

Try making “latkes” with 100% sweet potatoes instead, or use some white potatoes but 50% shredded zucchini, carrots, onions, sweet potatoes, fall squash, parsnips, turnips or other nutrient-dense root vegetables.

You can even blend broccoli or cauliflower in (stems included!), but no more than a quarter of the total shreds or the flavor comes through in an unpleasant way.

Want to make Popeye proud or celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in style? Try spinach. It makes the pancakes green. And awesome! Get the recipe for Potato Vegetable Pancakes HERE.

Time-saving Tip: Shredding all these veggies, even in a food processor, can take a lot of time in the morning. You can totally get away with shredding them the night before and keeping the mixture ready to go in the fridge, then frying in the a.m.

Save even more time by planning a dinner meal for that night using the food processor, or even just shred cheese for the freezer. A little cheese residue isn’t going to mess with your shredded veggies.

Bonus idea: why not leftovers for breakfast?

I may or may not have known a teenager who would eat cold chicken stir fry in the mornings standing at my…er, her kitchen counter.

Do you need a breakfast makeover? What are your goals for your kids in the morning?

Another time that’s a mighty hard sell for healthy, nourishing food is the potluck table. It can even be tricky to figure out what to bring that others will eat and enjoy. I’m excited to share a mini eBook with the Nourishing Gourmet audience: 10 Real Food Party Recipes for Every Eater.

The recipes range from appetizer to salad to adult beverage, all homemade, not too pricey, and totally beloved by even the Standard American Eater. They’re some of my family’s favorites, and I’ll share my best tip for helping kids eat well even at parties with sugar-laden buffet tables. If you are interested in getting this eBook and signing up for my newsletter, click on the button below!

Free Cookbook – Download NOW >>

About the author

Katie Kimball is the boss lady over at Kitchen Stewardship, where she digs into real food research and recipes with a non-toxic fork. It’s all about the balance – keeping your family, earth and budget healthy at the same time. She’s the author of 7 eBooks, including Healthy Snacks to Go, Better Than a Box, and all these. Feel free to use the code GOURMET for 30% off one or all of them. :) She’s also mom to 4 children, ages 9, 6, 3 and 4 months, all of whom actually eat her food, including vegetables at breakfast (but not sauteed greens. Good luck getting kids to eat those!).