Grain Free Fried Chicken Strips

Pan fried in coconut oil, these chicken strips are also gluten, dairy, grain, and egg free!  (Kids love them!) --- The Nourishing Gourmet
Sometimes you make something that is so delicious; the kids are begging for you to repeat it soon. This was one of those times! Gently fried in a pan, these crispy crusted, tender chicken strips are delicious dipped into homemade ketchup. Plus, they are gluten-free, grain-free, egg-free and dairy-free as well!. These are so delicious and have officially made it into the “must regularly make ” pile of recipes. We repeated the recipe the week after we first made it (you know, just to make sure they were good enough to share here. :-) )

I used coconut oil for frying these, but there are a variety of traditional fats that could work too. I was going to try my homemade rendered fat from beef broth, but I realized I didn’t have enough of it left for this project. I’ll try it next time!

I made these using the “eye-balling” method, partly because it’s kind of the lazy way to do it, and partly because thermometers and I have an on and off relationship. I buy supposedly great thermometers, and then they aren’t very accurate. (Tell me if you have a favorite one in the comments!). All to say, I have been perfecting the act of watchful cooking without one. That said, if you are using a thermometer, aim for 375F (190C).

Is fried food healthy?

Yes, this is a recipe that fries food. Can that really be healthy? First of all, regardless of whether you think fried food is the best option, making fried food yourself using a healthy oil is certainly better for you than getting it at a restaurant using typical nontraditional oils. Furthermore, there is some discrepancy in the research, and some research even suggests that frying in a good oil could be neutral or even have benefits.

I’m not convinced it should be on the menu weekly (hello, budgeting!), but certainly, it makes a wonderful treat!

Pan fried in coconut oil, these chicken strips are also gluten, dairy, grain, and egg free!  (Kids love them!) --- The Nourishing Gourmet

Grain Free Fried Chicken Strips

Ingredients: 

  • 1 ½- 2 pounds chicken thighs (or breasts)
  • 1 ½ cups tapioca starch
  • 2 ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • freshly ground pepper
  • coconut oil for frying

1. Cut off any fat from the chicken, and then cut into thin strips, about ¼-1/2 inch thick.

2. Put the tapioca starch, salt, thyme and plenty of ground pepper into a shallow pan and mix.

Pan fried in coconut oil, these chicken strips are also gluten, dairy, grain, and egg free! (Kids love them!) --- The Nourishing Gourmet

3. Toss the chicken strips and the starch mixture together until the chicken is well coated.

4. In a large saucepan (I prefer using cast iron for this), heat fat of choice. I used approximately 1 to 1 ½ cups of coconut oil. I wanted the chicken to be half submerged once it was put in. Heat the oil in a cast iron over medium heat (with a stainless steel pan, use medium-high heat), until hot (but not smoking). Add a single chicken strip to the pan, if it starts bubbling a lot around the chicken strip immediately, you have a good frying temperature (if not, don’t add any more until it starts bubbling around that single chicken strip, and then add more).

Pan fried in coconut oil, these chicken strips are also gluten, dairy, grain, and egg free!  (Kids love them!) --- The Nourishing Gourmet

5. Add the strips carefully one by one, not crowding the pan. Wait until the chicken looks at least cooked half way through and is starting to get a little browned, and then turn over and cook on the other side. It took about 6-9 minutes for each batch to cook through. I simply cut through a chicken strip to check to make sure they were done, although once they were browned at all, I never found a single one that hadn’t gotten cooked thoroughly. Remove from the pan once cooked.

6. Repeat the frying process until all of the chicken is cooked. Serve with homemade ketchup and enjoy right away!

Interested in saving your oil for future frying projects? Check out this helpful link.

Grain Free Fried Chicken Strips
 
Serves: 4-6
 
Ingredients
  • 1 ½- 2 pounds chicken thighs (or breasts)
  • 1 ½ cups tapioca starch
  • 2 ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • freshly ground pepper
  • coconut oil for frying
Instructions
  1. Cut off any fat from the chicken, and then cut into thin strips, about ¼-1/2 inch thick.
  2. Put the tapioca starch, salt, thyme and plenty of ground pepper into a shallow pan and mix.
  3. Toss the chicken strips and the starch mixture together until the chicken is well coated.
  4. In a large saucepan (I prefer using cast iron for this), heat fat of choice. I used approximately 1 to 1 ½ cups of coconut oil. I wanted the chicken to be half submerged once it was put in. Heat the oil in a cast iron over medium heat (with a stainless steel pan, use medium-high heat), until hot (but not smoking). Add a single chicken strip to the pan, if it starts bubbling a lot around the chicken strip immediately, you have a good frying temperature (if not, don’t add any more until it starts bubbling around that single chicken strip, and then add more).
  5. Add the strips carefully one by one, not crowding the pan. Wait until the chicken looks at least cooked half way through and is starting to get a little browned, and then turn over and cook on the other side. It took about 6-9 minutes for each batch to cook through. I simply cut through a chicken strip to check to make sure they were done, although once they were browned at all, I never found a single one that hadn’t gotten cooked thoroughly.
  6. Repeat the frying process until all of the chicken is cooked. Serve with homemade ketchup and enjoy right away!

 

How to Render Tallow from Your Beef Broth

After you make homemade beef stock/broth, there is always a lovely layer of tallow on the top of the broth. Learn here how you can render and save it for lots of cooking projects! Don't waste it! It's an excellent cooking fat. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

So, you’ve made a delicious, nutritious, homemade beef broth, and it now has a glorious layer of beef fat on the top. Now what? Don’t waste it! With just a few short steps, you can render it for a delicious cooking fat! This lovely cooking fat is stable at high temperatures, making it lovely for sautéing or roasting vegetables and meats, and many other uses!

As long-time readers know, I try to balance using quality, good ingredients, with a realistic budget. A practical way to make that happen is by not wasting anything. Certainly, saving and using this quality fat is a great way to eat well AND save money! Because we try to only buy top quality oils and fats, this helps tremendously in how much we spend on our oils/fats.

And don’t worry. It’s simple to make!

How to Render Tallow from Beef Broth

After you make homemade beef stock/broth, there is always a lovely layer of tallow on the top of the broth. Learn here how you can render and save it for lots of cooking projects! Don't waste it! It's an excellent cooking fat. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

1. After you have cooled your homemade beef broth in the refrigerator, there should be a layer of fat on the top. How much fat there is depends on what type of bones you use. Because we try to use at least some marrow bones in each batch, we typically have quite a bit. Scoop this fat off and place into a pot. (I use a small pot for one batch of fat.)

After you make homemade beef stock/broth, there is always a lovely layer of tallow on the top of the broth. Learn here how you can render and save it for lots of cooking projects! Don't waste it! It's an excellent cooking fat. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

2. Gently heat the fat over low heat until it is completely liquid.

After you make homemade beef stock/broth, there is always a lovely layer of tallow on the top of the broth. Learn here how you can render and save it for lots of cooking projects! Don't waste it! It's an excellent cooking fat. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

3. Pour over cheesecloth placed over a fine sieve over a heat safe bowl (or 4 cup measuring cup) to strain out any bits.

After you make homemade beef stock/broth, there is always a lovely layer of tallow on the top of the broth. Learn here how you can render and save it for lots of cooking projects! Don't waste it! It's an excellent cooking fat. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

4. At this point, you can do the lazy method of simply pouring the fat into a mason jar and re-hardening it in the refrigerator. Any leftover bits or small drops of broth will go to the bottom of the jar, and because fat is a type of preservative, the fat won’t go bad and I just don’t use the very last bit of fat at the bottom of the jar. This is what is pictured above.

5. Or, to make it completely free of any broth or bits, pour into a wide container such as an 8 by 8-inch pan. Let re-harden in the refrigerator, and then remove from the pan and turn upside down. You can then scrape off any bits or broth from the bottom of the fat. Reheat to liquefy, and pour into desired container of choice.

Keep refrigerated. Will keep for at least several months when refrigerated (freeze for longer storage).

How to Render Tallow from Your Beef Broth
 
Serves: 1 cup
 
You will need a fine sieve and cheesecloth for this recipe.
Ingredients
  • Fat skimmed from the top of homemade beef stock
Instructions
  1. After you have cooled your homemade beef broth in the refrigerator, there should be a layer of fat on the top. How much fat there is depends on what type of bones you use. Because we try to use at least some marrow bones in each batch, we typically have quite a bit. Scoop this fat off and place into a pot. (I use a small pot for one batch of fat.)
  2. Gently heat the fat over low heat until it is completely liquid.
  3. Pour over cheesecloth placed over a fine sieve over a heat safe bowl to strain out any bits.
  4. At this point, you can do the lazy method of simply pouring the fat into a mason jar and re-hardening it in the refrigerator. Any leftover bits or small drops of broth will go to the bottom of the jar, and because fat is a type of preservative, the fat won’t go bad and I just don’t use the very last bit of fat at the bottom of the jar. This is what is pictured above.
  5. Or, to make it completely free of any broth or bits, pour into a wide container such as an 8 by 8-inch pan. Let re-harden in the refrigerator, and then remove from the pan and turn upside down. You can then scrape off any bits or broth from the bottom of the fat. Reheat to liquefy, and pour into desired container of choice.
  6. Keep refrigerated. Will keep for at least several months when refrigerated (freeze for longer storage).

Related Posts:

Navigating the Confusing “Health Food” World

It can be confusing to work through all of the different opinions on what is truly a "healthy" diet, but these overarching principles really help me! Recipes pictured above: 3 Ingredient Teriyaki Chicken and Japanese Cucumber Salad

Have you ever felt confused about the food item in your hand because you’ve read so many conflicted reports on what is “truly” healthy? Life, in general, can be confusing when we’ve gotten the advice from too many people with differing opinions, and it’s no different with food choices. Many of us have read books, articles and blog posts with very diverse opinions on what it means to eat a healthy diet.

You’d think that at least vegetables would be free of controversy because everyone thinks vegetables are healthy, right? Wrong. Even vegetables can be criticized because truly nothing we eat gets a free pass by everyone. And there seems to be research supporting everyone’s viewpoints.

That’s frustrating. And it can make you either give up completely in trying to eat healthy, or fear food, neither of which are very good or freeing choices.

My goals for the food I serve and eat include these: The food should be delightful to the senses (even if it’s simple food). The food should promote health, not detract from it. I should feel good and thrive on it.

I freely admit that once you have specific health concerns that seem to be affected by the food you eat (whether that’s achy joints, stomachaches, eczema or ______, you fill in the blank), food choices become more complicated and what works for one person may not work for you.

I’m not going to make believe that I can solve all of these dilemmas in one blog post (as indeed, I still have many unanswered questions myself and am navigating some of the more complicated questions personally). But in an overall way, I’ve come up with some general principles that help me navigate this confusing “health food world” with it’s many conflicting opinions and research.

Steamed Artichokes with Three Dipping Sauces cover

Pictured above: Steamed Artichokes with 3 Dipping Sauces

Do I feel good eating this way?

This is so simple, yet it’s so important! Sometimes people can get so wrapped up in their mind and what “they believe to be true” that they ignore the very important signals their body is sending off to them. When your body is sending signals of distress after eating a certain way for a while (whether that’s vegan, hardcore paleo, or a mainstream American diet), you shouldn’t ignore them, regardless of what ideology you’ve bought into.

Part of nourishing the body is respecting it. And you can’t respect the body if you ignore it.

Does that mean you have to abandon entirely the type of diet you’ve chosen for yourself if you don’t feel well on it? Not necessarily, as sometimes it’s all about adjustment. Sometimes people on grain free diets just need to increase their carbs to feel amazing. Sometimes someone whose diet is very produce centered needs to increase fats and protein to feel great again.

But the point of our dietary choices is to help our bodies feel great so that we can enjoy life to it’s fullest. Those on healing diets may need to have patience and endurance to get there, but that’s the goal in the end.

Keeping that one question in mind has helped me navigate some of my food choices. For unexplained reasons I was experiencing very achy joints for a while, and cutting out certain foods helped relieve that pain. So I did. I read some interesting research indicating that we shouldn’t drink too much water and tried to cut down on how much water I drank, and just felt dehydrated and blah. I went back to drinking to thirst and ignoring the opinions of those who thought “I was doing it wrong”. We can read all of the research we want, but in the end, if our bodies don’t respond well to those dietary changes, we should listen to our bodies!

Greek Lemon Beef and Rice Lettuce Wraps! These only take 30 minutes to throw together and are made with nutrient dense ingredients. Plus, they are delicious, and the whole family can enjoy them.

Pictured above: Greek Lemon-y Beef and Rice

There is a place for picking a food philosophy

That doesn’t mean you should become a mess “listening to your body” and making drastic changes every time you sneeze. That would be utterly frustrating. There is a place for picking a food philosophy, and letting that guide you through the tangled web of opinions and research.

For example, in a broad sense, I have a food philosophy that food should be enjoyed and that the best foods to enjoy are those that are nutrient dense and traditionally valued. That’s why we choose to eat grassfed beef whenever possible, and add salmon roe to our sushi, take cod liver oil, and ferment our foods too. Because this food philosophy made sense to me, and then all of us feel good eating this way, I can more easily ignore the blaring and glaring headlines that tell me if we eat animal protein, we might as well be eating Twinkies.

Granted, we’ve had to make a lot of adjustments within that philosophy as we’ve discovered that half the family does really poorly with gluten and eggs, but it’s still within that framework that we’ve worked.

If you pick a dietary framework that makes sense to you, and your body seems to thrive on, it is a lot easier to ignore the competing opinions out there.

Cuban Picadillo Lettuce Wraps Slider

Pictured above: Cuban Picadillo Lettuce Wraps

Food should be enjoyed

This is something that needs to be repeated often. Food should be enjoyed. You should enjoy your food. Food should taste good. We should celebrate food. Food is a beautiful gift, and you should enjoy it. And I could go on.

When did healthy eating become equated with doing a penance? Or putting yourself through something grueling and horrible?

I know it can be hard to adjust to eating real food after a life eating and drinking industrial food. There can be a real sense to grieving when you leave junk food behind and it’s important to acknowledge that it can be really tough to change diets around.

But drudgery in eating is not the goal!

I truly believe that food is a gift from God, and when we make it into a meaningless task of tasteless food that has to be shoveled down, we are the ones missing out.

It’s true that I have to forgo on foods that I love and would enjoy eating because they bother me. But it’s also true that I choose to see the beauty in the food that I can have, and make that food delicious so that I can thoroughly enjoy it.

I know that’s a high ideal in the busyness of life (and hey, right now with a newborn, I’m happy just to keep food on the table that didn’t come from a can!), but it’s really what we should be aiming for. Enjoyment of food is not bad.

Let me repeat that. Enjoyment of food is not bad.

I think because our society values skinniness and has such an abhorrence of the idea of being a “glutton”, that we are afraid of talking about the enjoyment of food. It’s almost as if we think that if we admit we like food, and that people should like food, that everyone will go and gorge themselves on food all day and weigh 600 pounds by the end of the year. We describe delicious desserts as “sinful”, because we can’t imagine something that tastes good being “good for you”, and we can’t imagine that our desire to enjoy food is good either.

Sure, moderation is key to enjoying life in general and in our food choices too, but part of eating well is having a healthy appreciation of the gift of food.

So when evaluating our food choices, we should also question our attitude behind it. Are we trying to “punish” our bodies into health? Because that will never work. Instead, we should nurture and nourish our bodies through our diets with a healthy appreciation for the beautiful world of food.

Keeping these three things in mind has helped me navigate the big questions on how we choose to eat, even when it doesn’t always answer the specific, smaller questions. I hope they are helpful to you too!

Cheat Sheet Cover for optinIf you haven’t gotten it yet, check out my free gift to subscribers right now. My eBook, Cheatsheet to a Healthy Diet in 10 Easy Steps helps you eat beautiful, healthy food without overwhelming you. Get it here.

Healthy Hand Roll Sushi (Made the “Lazy Susan” Method)

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

These hand roll sushis have crispy nori, sweet teriyaki fish, gingery fish eggs, crisp cucumbers and tender avocado. They are very delicious, easy to make (as everyone makes their own), and full of nutrient dense ingredients!

My husband (who is a quarter Japanese-American) thought it very important to introduce me to the joys of sushi before we got married. I think that he was going to be a bit sad if I disliked it, but thankfully for both of us, I loved it! And now our children enjoy it as well. This is the method my mother-in-law used for making hand rolls and she called it “lazy Susan sushi” because everyone makes their own sushi! We like how the seaweed doesn’t soften at all, but stays crisp when made this way. Joel and I like that this method allows us to get dinner on the table much quicker than when we roll sushi.

Now, please note, that this isn’t “authentic” “traditional” sushi by any means. This is parent and child-friendly sushi. 😉 And I’m okay with that – especially in this season of life with three little people. But I’ve included a link for how to roll more authentic hand roll sushi too.

Easy Hand Rolls/Lazy Susan Method

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing GourmetThis couldn’t be easier. You provide nori squares, sushi rice, and a bunch of sushi filling options, and everyone makes their own sushi at the table. It’s delicious and fun! Of course, if you had a large lazy Susan, this would be the meal to use it at!

I find that having the kids involved in making their own sushi also helps them feel confident in trying new foods (because it’s not forced on them). For example, I noticed my four-year-old heaping salmon roe on her sushi the other day! Because she made the choice to try them out, and I wasn’t forcing her to put them on, she was willing to try it, found that she liked it, and then helped herself to plenty of it.

The benefits of roe (fish eggs)

It can be expensive to by fish eggs, though you may be surprised at how reasonable some brands are, but it’s worth the buy when you can manage it. Fish eggs are a great source of several important nutrients, including omega 3’s, vitamin D, and vitamin B12, and selenium. Many studies have found a connection between a healthy brain and mood and omega 3’s and vitamin B12’s, and vitamin D and selenium with a healthy immune system. Even the FDA is blogging about the benefits of seafood, including roe, for babies and children!

I recommend roe from wild salmon for both taste and nutritive value. Both fish roe and seaweed were traditionally highly valued for their health-promoting attributes – especially for young children and pregnant and nursing women.

Why we try to eat seaweed weekly

My doctor recommend that I try to eat more seaweed for the iodine (read more about the benefits of eating seaweed here), and this method of making sushi, along with this Nori and Sesame Seed sprinkle, is a pain-free and delicious way to enjoy it. I started a short series on seaweed right before my daughter was born, and am finally getting back to it with this post! (Thanks for being so patient with me!). I am going to be aiming for eating seaweed three times a week according to my doctor’s direction, but you should probably consult your own doctor before chowing down almost every other day on seaweed since there can be some contradictions with certain thyroid disorders.

I know some of my readers have expressed concerns about radiation issues and seaweed and seafood. I have been attempting to find a brand of nori sheets that for sure wouldn’t be affected by the Japanese meltdown, but it’s been the hardest one for me to source. Some choices that may be good include, nori sheets from China such as this brand or this brand. (I’d love some reader insight here. If you look at at world map, you see that China is right by Japan. How I understand the current is that the water from Japan is being pushed towards us on the west side of the U.S., so I would assume it wouldn’t be going back towards China. But please correct me if wrong.) Iceland was looking into making nori sheet for sushi, which would be ideal! But I haven’t found it on the market yet. The only nori I’ve been able to source that’s not from the Pacific so far has been nori not in sheets such as this one. If anyone has a source, please let us know in the comments!

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

Should you eat raw fish?

You will notice that I didn’t include raw fish in the below sushi ingredients. I do enjoy raw fish occasionally, but the possible risks of parasites is a little unnerving, especially as a friend had a lot of health issues after becoming infected with a parasite from raw fish in sushi. To cut down on the risks, it had been recommended to freeze seafood for 2 weeks before consuming it raw, however newer recommendations state that home freezers may not reach cold enough temperatures, so only commercially frozen seafood would be considered safe. If you enjoy raw fish, you may want to keep some of these guidelines in mind and use very high-quality fish. It’s really lovely to enjoy thinly sliced raw fish in these hand rolls, so feel free to add it! 

A couple notes on the ingredients:

  • Feel free to mix things up! We do. You can mix and match as many sushi filling ideas as you like!
  • If you can’t have rice or grain, check out this grain-free cauliflower rice. But if you have a lot of delicious fillings, I even enjoy simply making nori wraps without any rice at all.

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

Hand Roll Sushi (Lazy Susan Method)

Serves 2-4

Ingredients:

  • Teriyaki Fish (see recipe below)
  • 1 jar of wild salmon roe (or fish eggs of choice)
  • Fresh ginger
  • Sushi rice (We often just salt our rice while it cooks instead of adding vinegar and a sweetener. Use sweetener of choice, if you do use.)
  • Squares of nori (a sheet of nori is cut into 4 equal squares)
  • Thin slices of peeled and seeded cucumber and avocado
  • Soy sauce or tamari (for gluten free), and wasabi for serving.

Directions:

1. Make teriyaki fish, and then slice or shred into small pieces (make sure all bones are removed), and make sushi rice.

2. Place the cucumber and avocado in bowls. Place the roe in a small bowl, and flavor with finely grated fresh ginger to taste. Cut nori into squares (four squares per sheet) and place on a plate.

3. Put all ingredients on the table with serving spoons and allow everyone to serve ingredients onto their plates to make their own hand rolls. Hand rolls can be made like this, the “right” way, or simply folded over as pictured above.

This easy and yummy teriyaki fish is perfect for a cooked fish filling for sushi! Very kid friendly too. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

Teriyaki Fish

This is the same simple teriyaki sauce as used in my teriyaki chicken. It’s so simple and delicious. I have been using Norwegian mackerel for this recipe, but you can use whatever fish you’d like. Salmon or black cod would be delicious too.

  • ¼ cup of coconut sugar or sweetener of choice
  • ½ cup organic tamari sauce (for gluten free) or organic soy sauce
  • 1 pound of fish fillets of choice (see note above)

1. Mix the sweetener and tamari sauce together and pour over the fish fillets in an oven proof pan. Let marinate for 20 minutes to 2 hours (the longer you marinate, the more pronounced the teriyaki flavor will be.

2. Preheat the oven to 275F, and then cook for 20-25 minutes, or until the fish is done.

3. Skin, and thinly slice or shred for sushi.

Healthy Hand Roll Sushi (Made the “Lazy Susan” Method)
 
 
Ingredients
  • Teriyaki Fish (see recipe below)
  • 1 jar of wild salmon roe (or fish eggs of choice)
  • Fresh ginger
  • Sushi rice (We often just salt our rice while it cooks instead of adding vinegar and a sweetener. Use sweetener of choice, if you do use.)
  • Squares of nori (a sheet of nori is cut into 4 equal squares)
  • Thin slices of peeled and seeded cucumber and avocado
  • Soy sauce or tamari, and wasabi for serving.
Instructions
  1. Make teriyaki fish, and then slice or shred into small pieces (make sure all bones are removed), and make sushi rice.
  2. Place the cucumber and avocado in bowls. Place the roe in a small bowl, and flavor with finely grated fresh ginger to taste. Cut nori into squares (four squares per sheet) and place on a plate.
  3. Put all ingredients on the table with serving spoons and allow everyone to serve ingredients onto their plates to make their own hand rolls.
  4. Hand rolls can be made like this, the “right” way, or simply folded over as pictured above.

Healthy Hand Roll Sushi (Made the “Lazy Susan” Method)
 
 
This is the same simple teriyaki sauce as my teriyaki chicken. It’s so simple and delicious. I have been using Norwegian mackerel for this recipe, but you can use whatever fish you’d like. Salmon or black cod would be delicious too.
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup of coconut sugar or sweetener of choice
  • ½ cup organic tamari sauce (for gluten free) or organic soy sauce
  • 1 pound of fish fillets of choice (see note above)
Instructions
  1. Mix the sweetener and tamari sauce together and pour over the fish filets in an oven proof pan. Let marinate for 20 minutes to 2 hours (the longer you marinate, the more pronounced the teriyaki flavor fill be. Preheat the oven to 275F, and then cook for 20-25 minutes, or until the fish is done.
  2. Skin, and thinly slice or shred for sushi.