Finding Seafood Untouched by Fukushima

Finding seafood untouched by Fukushima

I shared recently both the negative and positive news about radiation from Japan and our Pacific Ocean seafood. While there is much to reassure, I know that some of my readers are choosing to avoid Pacific seafood. I decided to share some of my personal research on the topic, not to try to influence anyone’s decision, but simply shared in the hope that it would be helpful to others also looking into the same topic. With that in mind, I wanted to share some of the resources I’ve found for buying Atlantic seafood. This is especially geared towards those who have personally felt compelled to stop consuming all or some of Pacific Ocean seafood.

Disclaimers: I am not saying that everyone should switch all of their seafood to Atlantic, because that would be a costly decision for Pacific fisheries that could be unnecessary. Yes, there is news that there are elevated radiation levels in certain species that carry more risk of exposure, such as tuna, because of their migration patterns. But there are a variety of opinions on how concerning that should be.  For those wondering what we are currently doing, we do still enjoy Pacific seafood, but I am buying most of our canned seafood (such as tuna) from Atlantic waters, and when there are options for it, fresh Atlantic seafood about half the time. So I do both still, but have decreased some of our Pacific seafood consumption. Also, when applicable, I have used affiliate links below.

Why consider keeping seafood in your diet

You may wonder why keeping seafood in your diet should be a serious consideration when there are so many concerns about it. Here are a couple reasons to consider it: First, not only is it a great source of protein and many important vitamins and minerals, but it is a very important source of Omega-3 fatty acids (most believe that there are many who don’t make the necessary conversions necessary from vegetarian precursors of Omega-3’s, such as flax seed). Because Omega-3 fatty acids are so important for pregnant women, many studies have linked seafood consumption during pregnancy to a decrease of complications, and healthier, smarter children. It could also be important for preventing depression, heart disease, strokes, and Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Price was also very impressed with the health of those with a seafood centered diet.

Here are just a couple of the studies supporting these claims:

Buying Fresh or Frozen Atlantic Seafood:

I’m sure that this varies completely by store and area, but I’ll just let you know what I have found locally, and that will hopefully help you know at least some things to look out for in your own area. I would recommend asking your local fish market what they carry from Atlantic waters, and checking the frozen seafood section. It’s usually easy to find the origin of the seafood on the back.

  • At New Seasons, I’ve gotten whole Mackerel from Norway (delicious, frugal, beautiful).
  • Zupans carried frozen mussels and clams that may have come from safer waters (I need to go back and check again).
  • I’ve also heard through the grapevine that a local fish market, Flying Fish Company, carries some Atlantic seafood as well.
  • A quick Google search for “where to buy Atlantic seafood online” will give you many companies that allow you to order online (just expect high shipping costs, unless you buy over a certain amount and qualify for free shipping).

Finding Seafood Untouched by Fukushima

Atlantic Canned Seafood:

Where I’ve really struck gold is finding canned seafood that is not from the Pacific Ocean. There are actually a variety of brands and options that are fairly easily found. I’ve both ordered online, and bought from a variety of nearby stores (they all seem to carry a slightly different collection). Because many of these brands are considered “gourmet”, checking out stores that cater to the gourmet or health food shopper is a good idea. There are many brands, and while I have found that all of these brands are all higher end, I’ve tried to keep with the more moderate priced brands below as it can get incredibly expensive.

Tuna: I ordered some amazingly delicious tuna from Radiant Life Catalog that comes from the southern coastal waters of Portugal. The brand name is Cole’s. Packed in olive oil, it is one of the best tasting tunas I’ve tried. (It does look much darker than the white tuna you often see, just so you’re not surprised.) This tuna is also high in Omega-3 fatty acids. Because tuna is more likely to have elevated radiation levels because of their migration patterns, this would be the most important seafood item to switch out for those concerned.

A couple other brands that I haven’t tried yet, that look promising (if you eat a lot of tuna, are pregnant, or feeding to young children, I’d check out whether these tunas are low-mercury): Ortiz Bonito Del Norte White Tuna in Olive Oil (from Spain), Frinsa Albacore Tuna in olive oil (in a glass jar) from Spain.

Wild Mackerel: Radiant Life Catalog also carries Cole’s wild mackerel in a variety of sauces that look delicious and are also fished from Portugal waters.

Sardines: Here is where I really struck gold. Sardines are a great source of protein, calcium (when the bones are left in), and Omega-3’s – A perfect health food. Through seeking out other brands I have finally found sardine brands that I actually enjoy eating, which I am thrilled about. (I’ll note my favorite brands below).

First, Cole’s also has Portuguese Sardines that come in a variety of sauces. I’m sure they are great after seeing the quality of their tuna, but I haven’t tasted them yet.

Crown Prince Wild Caught Skinless, Boneless Sardines: These are caught in Morocco, and are an excellent option for those wanting the omega-3 fatty acid benefits to seafood, without having to eat bones (which many sardines still contain, and are a good source of calcium, but not everyone’s cup-of-tea). It’s also canned in a BPA-free can.

Crown Prince Natural Brisling Sardines: Now, these were one of the great finds for me, as I found I personally really enjoy eating these sardines! First, they are much, much smaller, so texturally much better for me (I’m a texture freak sometimes). Secondly, they are smoked, and I found that I LOVE smoked sardines! I was so happy to finally find a brand that I could enjoy eating straight from the can. These are from Scotland, and are also in a BPA-free can. Check out the different flavor options too, available on Amazon.

Sardines

And just this last week we got the chance to try two types of Matiz Gallego Sardines after finding them at a store we don’t normally shop at, and they were absolutely a hit. They are caught off the coast of Galicia, which has a long tradition of excellent seafood. This company uses methods that respect the biological cycles of the species, which I really like as well.

Matiz Gallego Sardines in Olive oil: These ones are a lovely basic sardine. Our can contained fairly large sardines. My oldest (who is seven) loved them. Because they are larger sardines, they aren’t my favorite. They also have a lemon flavored version, and canned octopus as well!

Matiz Gallego Sardinillas with Piquillo Peppers: Oh my goodness, this is my new favorite sardine! Even my three year old, who usually won’t eat sardines, loved this one! It has two things going for it, first “sardinillas” apparently means baby sardines, so they are small and tender, and not mushy like the big ones can be. Secondly, they have a delicious, sweet pepper sauce that just highlights the flavor enough to make you really enjoy them. I’m a fan.

Other brands I haven’t tried yet:

I also wanted to share a couple other brands that I haven’t had the chance to try yet, but fulfill similar criteria.

Bela-Olhao Sardines: These are fished from Portugal, canned within eight hours of being caught, and come in four flavors, olive oil, hot sauce, tomato and lemon sauce.

King Oscar Brisling Sardines: As I mentioned before, brisling sardines are so much smaller than other types, that texturally I like them so much better. This brand also smokes them, cans them in olive oil, and they are fished from the coastal water of Norway. BPA-free. These are also a great price on Amazon right now. Also check out all of the available flavors here.

NW Polar Kipper Snacks: Fished from North Sea and North Atlantic

Does anyone have some other great brands to add? I’d love to get more recommendations!

Thanks for supporting this blog by purchasing through any affiliate links! It keeps this blog up and running. 

Is Pacific Seafood Safe from Radiation?

Is Pacific seafood safe from radiation?

(Photo: Clams in a Saffron & Herbed Broth with Pan Fried Crumbs from Everyday Nourishing Foods)

 

Ever since the horrible emergency in Japan, there has been a lot of turmoil over whether Pacific seafood is currently – or in the future going to be – contaminated with radiation from Fukushima. There are a lot of opinions on this subject, and I’ve read myself in circles over it ever since this disaster. While clearly those living close to Fukushima in Japan are by far those with the most concerns, I think it’s a valid question for us to consider what – if any – effect Fukushima could have on us through our environment and/or food.

Because seafood is an important part of a healthy diet according to a traditional, Dr. Price inspired viewpoint, I am loath to cut out this important food unless absolutely necessary.

I don’t feel comfortable giving you a pat answer to this complicated question, but I thought I would share some of the different opinions and information I came across in the hopes that it would help you be more informed. There is so much information out there (and a lot of wild opinions and speculations too), I’m not going to be able to cover everything, but please feel free to add your opinions and other links to the comment section. And don’t miss my resources for Atlantic seafood (for those who remain concerned about Pacific seafood) coming soon.

First, I want to primarily deal with the issue of eating Pacific seafood, however here is a brief overview of different information on radiation in our general environment. For those of us on the West Coast of the U.S., there has been a concern with how much radiation could be falling on us through the air and in our rainwater. I was reading a children’s book to my two girls recently that explained that dust particles from Japan will reach the U.S. in one week, a rather grim reminder of how connected we are to each other – even across a wide ocean.

Negative news on radiation levels on the West Coast

So I guess it’s no surprise that according to this study “ Just days after the meltdowns, I-131 [radioactive iodine] concentrations in US precipitation was measured up to 211 times above normal” and “Highest levels of I-131 and airborne gross beta [radioactive particles] were documented in the five US States on the Pacific Ocean.” This study linked this rise to congenital hypothyroid cases that rose 28% shortly after the disaster.

To further this discouraging vein (especially for those, like me, who live on the West Coast), an article published in 2012 (written by some experts on radiation issues) gave us this information on the short-term impact of Fukushima,

“How much radiation entered the U.S. environment? A July 2011 journal article by officials at Pacific Northwest National Lab in Eastern Washington state measured airborne radioactive Xenon-133 up to 40,000 times greater than normal in the weeks following the fallout. Xenon-133 is a gas that travels rapidly and does not enter the body but signals that other, more dangerous types of radioactive chemicals will follow.

A February 2012 journal article by the U.S. Geological Survey looked at radioactive Iodine-131 that entered soil from rainfall, and found levels hundreds of times above normal in places like Portland, Ore., Fresno, Calif., and Denver, Colo. The same places also had the highest levels of Cesium-134 and Cesium-137 in the U.S. While elevated radiation levels were found in all parts of the country, it appears that the West Coast and Rocky Mountain states received the greatest amounts of Fukushima fallout.

On Dec. 19, 2011, we announced the publication of the first peer-reviewed scientific journal article examining potential health risks after Fukushima. In the 14-week period March 20-June 25, 2011, there was an increase in deaths reported to the Centers for Disease Control by 122 U.S. cities. If final statistics – not available until late 2014 – confirm this trend, about 14,000 “excess” deaths occurred among Americans in this period.

We made no statement that only Fukushima fallout caused these patterns. But we found some red flags: Infants had the greatest excess – infants are most susceptible to radiation – and a similar increase occurred in the U.S. in the months following Chernobyl. Our study reinforced Fukushima health hazard concerns, and we hope to spur others to engage in research on both short-term and long-term effects.”

Positive news about radiation on the West Coast

That’s pretty depressing news, as reported closer to the actual disaster! On the other side of things, however, both the FDA and grassroots radiation monitoring seem to agree that there aren’t currently (or for the last couple of years been) abnormal radiation levels. The grassroots network is made up of people around the world who have invested in proper radiation meter equipment who turn in their readings. You can follow their map for hourly updates.

On the EPA website you can check out the nearest radiation monitor near your address, which is pretty cool, and see a graph of radiation levels.  According to the Oregon state government, there hasn’t been a significant increase in radiation levels.

And this is a nice transition into our main topic – radiation and Pacific seafood – while there had been a small increase in radiation in seaweed near the California coast two years ago, those levels, as reported in January of this year, have been dropping ever since. 

Why there is concern about radiation from Fukshima

There is good reason to have concern about our sea life and environment. It’s also important to weigh the evidence in deciding what seafood we eat from the Pacific Ocean. Why is there concern? Since the disaster, 300 tons of radioactive water has flowed into the ocean everyday. That’s a problem. But how much of a problem?

Good news about radiation in seafood on the West Coast

Independent results confirm low or no radiation

Let’s start with the good news this time. First, many fisheries, responding to this concern, have sent seafood samples into independent labs to test for radioactive content. Vital Choices (an Alaskan fishery) has so far found none. 

Another company dealing with the customers’ fears about radiation in seafood sent samples to labs with reassuring results.

“It sent seven samples of salmon caught in Southeast Alaska and Puget Sound to a laboratory in Louisiana, at a cost of $1,200. The company released the reports in January and posted the results on its website.
What did it find? Five samples did not register any level of radiation. Two showed very low traces—well below any limits set by the government and consistent with background levels of radiation in common foods, says Knutson.”

FDA testing confirms no need for concern

An FDA update in March 2014 says that our food supply (including seafood) remains safe, and we don’t need to alter our eating habits because of Fukushima.

Even at its worst, radiation levels are very low (bananas could be worse than fish!)

Chris Kresser, a well-respected practitioner of integrative medicine in the real food world, shared his views on this issue in a podcast. He was able to put into perspective the fears of radiation in fish. He put it so well, I wanted to share an excerpt from the transcript.

“There was one large review in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS, the journal, and it evaluated the health risk of consuming Pacific Bluefin tuna that was caught in the Pacific after the Fukushima event around San Diego, I believe is where the fish were caught were for this study. And the study was done by some researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a couple other organizations around the world, and they’re all independent researchers. There were no conflicts of interest, nobody that was working for the fish lobby! And let me just highlight a few of the findings for you. They estimated that a typical restaurant-sized portion of Pacific Bluefin tuna that was contaminated with radioactive isotopes cesium-134 and cesium-137 contains about 5% of the radiation you’d get from eating one uncontaminated banana and absorbing its naturally occurring radiation.

The really important thing to remember here is that all foods contain radiation because there’s radiation that’s just naturally a part of our planet. Bananas contain much more radiation in them, despite not being contaminated by Fukushima fallout, than a restaurant-sized portion, a 7-ounce portion, of fish. So, the issue is not whether we’re exposed to radiation, because we are, all of us, on a daily basis exposed to radiation in food, just walking around. If we go on a cross-country flight, we’re exposed to radiation. Like every other toxin, the question is what’s the dose? A small amount of toxin we can handle. A large amount of toxin causes problems. That’s really important to keep in mind with this. It is true that cesium-134 and cesium-137, which are these radioactive isotopes, have been found in fish because of Fukushima, but the levels are so low that they’re not going to cause any health problems, even in people who are eating fish at extremely high levels. For example, if you ate three-quarters of a pound a day of this contaminated Bluefin tuna for an entire year, you’d still receive only 12% of the dose of radiation you’re exposed to during a single cross-country flight from LA to New York. That should put it into perspective a little bit. Also, at that same level of consumption, the excess relative risk of fatal cancers would only be two additional cases per 10 million similarly exposed people, and that’s such a low number that in statistics and health there’s really reason to believe that’s no more than chance. And, in fact, statistically significant elevations in cancer risk are only observed typically at doses of radiation that are 25,000 times higher than what you’d expect to be exposed to by eating the three-quarters of a pound a day of Bluefin tuna.”

Bad news about radiation and seafood

That’s the good news. What about the bad news? Here are a couple things to consider.

Certain currents are bringing more radiated water to U.S. coasts now (this started late 2013). While many scientists say the radiated water will be too diluted by the time it reaches us, others disagree. It’s an unknown situation.

Another concern is that different radioactive material is now being leaked from the plant – some of which lasts much, much longer and is considered by some to be even more dangerous.

There is more concern with certain fish that travel extensively, namely tuna and salmon (in 2012 tuna was found to contain elevated radiation levels). Because of the wide traveling habits of these fish, they are more at risk to contain higher amounts of radiation. While the more conservative voices say that there is little to worry about, the more concerned voices point out how unprecedented this situation is, and how little we know for sure. Because of that, there continues to be a push for more testing by the FDA, as well as pro bono testing by a variety of universities and concerned scientists. Because the situation is hardly stable or contained in Japan at this point, the far-reaching future effects of the situation are still unknown, although most research to date is reassuring.

My personal conclusion

Overall, I find that there is a general agreement of reassuring research for those of us in the U.S. But I remain concerned enough to continue to keep track of new information as it comes. For those who simply no longer feel comfortable eating Pacific seafood, I’d like to give you a couple of resources for Atlantic seafood in another post soon to be published. So stay tuned for that!

Other articles of interest on TheNourishingGourmet.com:

Quinoa Salad with Cucumbers, Chickpeas, and a Yogurt Dill Dressing

Quinoa salad yogurt dill dressing

By April Swiger, Contributing Writer

This quinoa salad has the unmistakable taste of fresh dill, tangy yogurt, and refreshing lemon and cucumber. Quinoa is gluten-free, packed with nutrients, and fills you up without ill effects when prepared properly. When soaked with a little raw apple cider vinegar, it’s easy to digest, and can be used in countless recipes ranging from breakfast porridges to summer salads.

Cucumbers have been on sale at my little local market the past two weeks and I’ve been itching to add them to a creamy yogurt based salad. As spring has finally sprung, I’m eager to begin making hearty and nourishing salads again for the warmer months. I love the idea of a filling side dish that can easily transfer over to a simple main dish. With the addition of chickpeas to this salad, it can be both!

Quinoa is a grain-like seed (from the same family as beets and spinach) and benefits from a long soak like other grains and legumes to reduce anti nutrients. There is a distinct bitter taste to quinoa which can be reduced significantly through soaking, and a thorough rinse before cooking. I have found that as I plan my meals for the week, adding an alert to my phone to “soak quinoa” the day before I need it has proved to be an easy way to incorporate this traditional practice into my routine.

quinoa salad yogurt dill dressing2

I love the addition of a creamy and tangy dressing to this salad! It’s reminiscent of a Greek tzatziki sauce but with the delicious taste of fresh dill. I used a Russian kefir yogurt for this recipe, but any plain, full-fat yogurt will work just fine. A whisk works great to blend all the ingredients together.

If you enjoy experimenting in the kitchen, you can easily adapt this recipe with different dressings and vegetables that are available to you. Kimi has shared a fantastic list of nourishing salad dressings that are very simple to make and can be substituted in this recipe. Along with that her cookbook, Fresh: Nourishing Salads for All Seasons, includes more salad dressing recipes and a couple of quinoa salads as well. Her summer quinoa salad is one of my favorites!

Other recipes you may enjoy:

Quinoa salad with cucumbers, chickpeas, and a yogurt dill dressing
 
Author:
Recipe type: Side, or main dish
 
This tangy quinoa salad could serve 8-10 people as a side dish, or 4-6 as a nourishing main dish
Ingredients
  • FOR THE SALAD:
  • 2 cups quinoa
  • 2 cups warm filtered water for soaking
  • 2 tbls raw apple cider vinegar (you can also use yogurt, kombucha, whey or kefir)
  • 2 cups filtered water for cooking
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cucumber, peeled if desired, and cubed
  • 1 small red onion, chopped
  • 1½-2 cups cooked chickpeas (or one 15 oz can)
  • FOR THE DRESSING:
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup yogurt
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 3 small garlic cloves, minced or crushed
  • 2 tbls fresh dill, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. The night before you make this dish, plan to soak your quinoa to make it more digestible. Place the quinoa in a non-reactive bowl or jar (preferably glass), and mix it with the warm filtered water and your raw ACV. Allow it to soak for at least 8 hours, and up to 24.
  2. When you're ready to make the salad, drain and rinse your quinoa in a fine sieve, allowing the water to run clear.
  3. Place your rinsed quinoa in a pot with 2 more cups of water and bring it to a boil.
  4. When it's boiling, cover the pot, and turn the heat to low, allowing it to simmer for 12-15 minutes. (These instructions are the same as Kimi's basic quinoa recipe and work for the various brands of quinoa that I've tried).
  5. When the quinoa is done, place it in a bowl to cool. You can leave it on the counter, or put it in the refrigerator.
  6. In the meantime, assemble your dressing. Whisk together the olive oil, yogurt, lemon juice, garlic cloves, fresh dill and salt and pepper.
  7. When the quinoa has cooled, gently mix in the cucumber, red onion and chickpeas.
  8. Pour the dressing over the quinoa mixture (you may not need it all), and mix thoroughly.
  9. This salad is best served at room temperature after preparing it, or lightly chilled. Top with additional dill, feta cheese, olives, or tomatoes if desired!

 

Beet Kvass: A Cleansing, Medicinal Tonic

beet kvass

By April Swiger, Contributing Writer

Some of the most beautiful stains on my cutting board are from beets. Tangy, earthy, salty, and a little bit of fizz perfectly describe this deeply nourishing, and richly medicinal, fermented beet kvass tonic. It’s an acquired taste, which I have slowly become accustomed to, and I have fallen head over heels for this blood red drink. Traditionally, tonics like this supplemented the daily diet, instead of supplement pills. 

(Disclaimer: Some links may be affiliate links, and this site has an affiliate association with Amazon)

Sally Fallon in Nourishing Traditions says (page 610): “This drink is valuable for its medicinal qualities and as a digestive aid. Beets are just loaded with nutrients. One 4-ounce glass, morning and night, is an excellent blood tonic, promotes regularity, aids digestion, alkalizes the blood, cleanses the liver and is a good treatment for kidney stones and other ailments.”

According to this article by the Weston A. Price Foundation, kvass originated in Russia and was traditionally made with stale sourdough rye bread. It boasted of great immune boosting qualities, and although it wasn’t an alcoholic drink, it was similar to beer in taste. Kvass can also be made with beets, and traditional homes in the Ukraine always had a bottle on hand. It was often used as a tangy addition in soups, vinaigrettes, and borscht.

The health benefits of lacto-fermented food are undeniable. As chopped beets mix with sea salt, the sugar and starch convert to lactic-acid perfectly preserving the kvass. The finished drink is full of beneficial enzymes, friendly probiotic bacteria, and increased vitamin levels. Regularly eating lacto-fermented vegetables, or incorporating beet kvass into your diet, will promote healthy gut flora, and greater absorption of nutrients from your food.

The first time I made beet kvass, I used Sally Fallon’s recipe in Nourishing Traditions which calls for the addition of whey to inoculate the mixture. We don’t eat much dairy in our home, so I opted to double the salt, and ferment my kvass for longer than the recommended two days. The end result was way too salty! However, after it sat in the refrigerator for a few more days, the saltiness diminished quite a bit, and I was able to drink it and enjoy it.

Wild fermentation is truly an art, and takes a little trial and error. In recent months I experimented with decreasing the amount of salt in my kvass while still using enough to allow proper fermentation to take place. My most recent batch was the fizziest yet and absolutely delicious! Depending on the time of year, and the temperature inside your home, your kvass may need anywhere from 2-7 days to ferment. This winter I’ve been allowing mine to sit at room temperature for a full week before putting it in the refrigerator.

Fermentation Vessel Choice

There has been some debate about what the best vessel is for lacto-fermentation. Wardee at GNOWFGLINS breaks down some great options. I personally have always used a mason jar with a metal band and lid. None of my ferments have ever gotten moldy (mold isn’t necessarily a bad thing), and I typically burp them once a day to release the pressure that builds up. This works for me, but it’s good to explore other options that may better suit your personal preferences.

Foam/Scum on Top

A few times my kvass has developed a thin layer of white or brown foam at the top. It’s harmless, and I typically scoop it out with a spoon before putting my jar in the refrigerator.

Filtered Water

It’s very important to use filtered water, free from chemicals like chlorine and fluoride. These chemicals are typically present in tap water and can prevent your kvass from fermenting properly. I have been using a Berkey filter  for two years now, and love it.

Sea Salt

Celtic sea salt is my salt of choice. It’s unrefined and packed full of nutrients and trace minerals. Standard table salt has iodine added to it, which could inhibit the growth of beneficial bacteria. Table salt is not a good choice for fermenting beet kvass, so it’s best to go with an unrefined sea salt.

How will I know when my beet kvass is ready?

When the kvass is a deep red color, and you see fizzy bubbles moving upwards in the jar, it’s good for drinking! It should smell earthy and salty, like beets. If it smells rancid, throw it out. Your nose will know, so don’t drink anything that smells off. If your home is fairly warm (over 72 F), your kvass is likely ferment quickly, so keep an eye on it. I let mine go for a week during the winter, and only a few days during the warmer months.

You can also use your beets for a second, weaker batch. Save about half a cup of the kvass in your jar as a “starter”, fill it with filtered water again, and set it out on your counter for a few days. Your kvass will last for many months in the refrigerator.

Other Uses

You can use your kvass in place of vinegar for salad dressings, or as a tangy addition to soups. Be sure to reduce any additional salt in your recipe! A recent favorite of mine is adding beet kvass to Kimi’s everyday salad dressing recipe in place of apple cider vinegar. The color is beautiful!

Beet Kvass Vinaigrette

Other Lacto-fermented Recipes:

Beet Kvass
 
Author:
Recipe type: Medicinal Tonic
 
Beet Kvass is a medicinal tonic that cleanses the blood, liver, and promotes healthy digestion. Enjoy 4 ounces of this drink in the morning and evening. This recipe makes one half gallon jar, or two quart sized jars.
Ingredients
  • 2 large, or 3-4 medium beets (preferably organic)
  • 1 tablespoon of sea salt
  • Filtered water
Instructions
  1. Peel your beets, and chop them up coarsely (1-2 inch chunks). Do not grate your beets! This will cause your kvass to ferment too rapidly, producing alcohol rather than lactic-acid (Sally Fallon, Nourishing Traditions, page 610)
  2. Put your chopped beets in your jar, or divide them equally between two quart sized jars
  3. Sprinkle the sea salt on top of your beets
  4. Fill your jar with filtered water, leaving about an inch at the top for headspace, and stir the contents well
  5. Secure the lid, and leave it on your counter for 2-7 days before moving it to the refrigerator