Healthy Hand Roll Sushi (Made the “Lazy Susan” Method)

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

These hand roll sushis have crispy nori, sweet teriyaki fish, gingery fish eggs, crisp cucumbers and tender avocado. They are very delicious, easy to make (as everyone makes their own), and full of nutrient dense ingredients!

My husband (who is a quarter Japanese-American) thought it very important to introduce me to the joys of sushi before we got married. I think that he was going to be a bit sad if I disliked it, but thankfully for both of us, I loved it! And now our children enjoy it as well. This is the method my mother-in-law used for making hand rolls and she called it “lazy Susan sushi” because everyone makes their own sushi! We like how the seaweed doesn’t soften at all, but stays crisp when made this way. Joel and I like that this method allows us to get dinner on the table much quicker than when we roll sushi.

Now, please note, that this isn’t “authentic” “traditional” sushi by any means. This is parent and child-friendly sushi. 😉 And I’m okay with that – especially in this season of life with three little people. But I’ve included a link for how to roll more authentic hand roll sushi too.

Easy Hand Rolls/Lazy Susan Method

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing GourmetThis couldn’t be easier. You provide nori squares, sushi rice, and a bunch of sushi filling options, and everyone makes their own sushi at the table. It’s delicious and fun! Of course, if you had a large lazy Susan, this would be the meal to use it at!

I find that having the kids involved in making their own sushi also helps them feel confident in trying new foods (because it’s not forced on them). For example, I noticed my four-year-old heaping salmon roe on her sushi the other day! Because she made the choice to try them out, and I wasn’t forcing her to put them on, she was willing to try it, found that she liked it, and then helped herself to plenty of it.

The benefits of roe (fish eggs)

It can be expensive to by fish eggs, though you may be surprised at how reasonable some brands are, but it’s worth the buy when you can manage it. Fish eggs are a great source of several important nutrients, including omega 3’s, vitamin D, and vitamin B12, and selenium. Many studies have found a connection between a healthy brain and mood and omega 3’s and vitamin B12’s, and vitamin D and selenium with a healthy immune system. Even the FDA is blogging about the benefits of seafood, including roe, for babies and children!

I recommend roe from wild salmon for both taste and nutritive value. Both fish roe and seaweed were traditionally highly valued for their health-promoting attributes – especially for young children and pregnant and nursing women.

Why we try to eat seaweed weekly

My doctor recommend that I try to eat more seaweed for the iodine (read more about the benefits of eating seaweed here), and this method of making sushi, along with this Nori and Sesame Seed sprinkle, is a pain-free and delicious way to enjoy it. I started a short series on seaweed right before my daughter was born, and am finally getting back to it with this post! (Thanks for being so patient with me!). I am going to be aiming for eating seaweed three times a week according to my doctor’s direction, but you should probably consult your own doctor before chowing down almost every other day on seaweed since there can be some contradictions with certain thyroid disorders.

I know some of my readers have expressed concerns about radiation issues and seaweed and seafood. I have been attempting to find a brand of nori sheets that for sure wouldn’t be affected by the Japanese meltdown, but it’s been the hardest one for me to source. Some choices that may be good include, nori sheets from China such as this brand or this brand. (I’d love some reader insight here. If you look at at world map, you see that China is right by Japan. How I understand the current is that the water from Japan is being pushed towards us on the west side of the U.S., so I would assume it wouldn’t be going back towards China. But please correct me if wrong.) Iceland was looking into making nori sheet for sushi, which would be ideal! But I haven’t found it on the market yet. The only nori I’ve been able to source that’s not from the Pacific so far has been nori not in sheets such as this one. If anyone has a source, please let us know in the comments!

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

Should you eat raw fish?

You will notice that I didn’t include raw fish in the below sushi ingredients. I do enjoy raw fish occasionally, but the possible risks of parasites is a little unnerving, especially as a friend had a lot of health issues after becoming infected with a parasite from raw fish in sushi. To cut down on the risks, it had been recommended to freeze seafood for 2 weeks before consuming it raw, however newer recommendations state that home freezers may not reach cold enough temperatures, so only commercially frozen seafood would be considered safe. If you enjoy raw fish, you may want to keep some of these guidelines in mind and use very high-quality fish. It’s really lovely to enjoy thinly sliced raw fish in these hand rolls, so feel free to add it! 

A couple notes on the ingredients:

  • Feel free to mix things up! We do. You can mix and match as many sushi filling ideas as you like!
  • If you can’t have rice or grain, check out this grain-free cauliflower rice. But if you have a lot of delicious fillings, I even enjoy simply making nori wraps without any rice at all.

This delightful and easy method of making sushi with healthy ingredients is delicious! Plus, it's both parent and kid-friendly. I love how everyone can pick out their own filling ingredients easily and be part of the creative process. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

Hand Roll Sushi (Lazy Susan Method)

Serves 2-4

Ingredients:

  • Teriyaki Fish (see recipe below)
  • 1 jar of wild salmon roe (or fish eggs of choice)
  • Fresh ginger
  • Sushi rice (We often just salt our rice while it cooks instead of adding vinegar and a sweetener. Use sweetener of choice, if you do use.)
  • Squares of nori (a sheet of nori is cut into 4 equal squares)
  • Thin slices of peeled and seeded cucumber and avocado
  • Soy sauce or tamari (for gluten free), and wasabi for serving.

Directions:

1. Make teriyaki fish, and then slice or shred into small pieces (make sure all bones are removed), and make sushi rice.

2. Place the cucumber and avocado in bowls. Place the roe in a small bowl, and flavor with finely grated fresh ginger to taste. Cut nori into squares (four squares per sheet) and place on a plate.

3. Put all ingredients on the table with serving spoons and allow everyone to serve ingredients onto their plates to make their own hand rolls. Hand rolls can be made like this, the “right” way, or simply folded over as pictured above.

This easy and yummy teriyaki fish is perfect for a cooked fish filling for sushi! Very kid friendly too. --- The Nourishing Gourmet

Teriyaki Fish

This is the same simple teriyaki sauce as used in my teriyaki chicken. It’s so simple and delicious. I have been using Norwegian mackerel for this recipe, but you can use whatever fish you’d like. Salmon or black cod would be delicious too.

  • ¼ cup of coconut sugar or sweetener of choice
  • ½ cup organic tamari sauce (for gluten free) or organic soy sauce
  • 1 pound of fish fillets of choice (see note above)

1. Mix the sweetener and tamari sauce together and pour over the fish fillets in an oven proof pan. Let marinate for 20 minutes to 2 hours (the longer you marinate, the more pronounced the teriyaki flavor will be.

2. Preheat the oven to 275F, and then cook for 20-25 minutes, or until the fish is done.

3. Skin, and thinly slice or shred for sushi.

Healthy Hand Roll Sushi (Made the “Lazy Susan” Method)
 
 
Ingredients
  • Teriyaki Fish (see recipe below)
  • 1 jar of wild salmon roe (or fish eggs of choice)
  • Fresh ginger
  • Sushi rice (We often just salt our rice while it cooks instead of adding vinegar and a sweetener. Use sweetener of choice, if you do use.)
  • Squares of nori (a sheet of nori is cut into 4 equal squares)
  • Thin slices of peeled and seeded cucumber and avocado
  • Soy sauce or tamari, and wasabi for serving.
Instructions
  1. Make teriyaki fish, and then slice or shred into small pieces (make sure all bones are removed), and make sushi rice.
  2. Place the cucumber and avocado in bowls. Place the roe in a small bowl, and flavor with finely grated fresh ginger to taste. Cut nori into squares (four squares per sheet) and place on a plate.
  3. Put all ingredients on the table with serving spoons and allow everyone to serve ingredients onto their plates to make their own hand rolls.
  4. Hand rolls can be made like this, the “right” way, or simply folded over as pictured above.

Healthy Hand Roll Sushi (Made the “Lazy Susan” Method)
 
 
This is the same simple teriyaki sauce as my teriyaki chicken. It’s so simple and delicious. I have been using Norwegian mackerel for this recipe, but you can use whatever fish you’d like. Salmon or black cod would be delicious too.
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup of coconut sugar or sweetener of choice
  • ½ cup organic tamari sauce (for gluten free) or organic soy sauce
  • 1 pound of fish fillets of choice (see note above)
Instructions
  1. Mix the sweetener and tamari sauce together and pour over the fish filets in an oven proof pan. Let marinate for 20 minutes to 2 hours (the longer you marinate, the more pronounced the teriyaki flavor fill be. Preheat the oven to 275F, and then cook for 20-25 minutes, or until the fish is done.
  2. Skin, and thinly slice or shred for sushi.

 

8 Healthy Gluten Free Freezer Meals

8 amazing gluten free freezer meals that are family friendly, healthy and so delicious! I love how easy all of the recipes are too. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

These varied, family-friendly and delicious gluten free freezer meals have been a lifesaver for us. I’m all about looking for ways to make dinners simple and as easy as possible, so I am in love with the ease of making and using freezer meals! It helps me use my time efficiently when in the kitchen and helps significantly with meal planning and food budgeting as well.

With the arrival of my newborn, Larkin, I was glad to have some gluten free freezer meals stored away. I recommend that anyone have freezer meals tucked away for after the baby is born, if possible. But it’s even more important for those who have food allergies or intolerances. Because one of my children is sensitive to a fairly wide variety of foods and I am as well, it makes it a lot harder to have people bring and make us food (although we were blessed by some delicious meals brought to us by friends and family after Larkin’s birth).

I had really high hopes for all of the meals and snacks I wanted to pre-make and store away before Larkin was born. But I got sick for several weeks at the end of my pregnancy and wasn’t able to complete everything. Thankfully, I was able to store away enough meals, or at least the main dish of a meal, that we had a nice little stash waiting for us when we got home from the hospital. These were completely essential to our survival these last two months, and we just have one or two things left. I am looking forward to restocking my freezer again!

Quick Tip

Because I had low energy and my “morning sickness” never quite went away, I had to pace myself during my pregnancy. So what I did was make one of the below items for our dinner, and then just doubled, tripled, or quadrupled the recipe. I recommend the practice as it was easy to fit into our schedule without having to have a whole day set aside for freezer meals.

1. Paleo Freezer Meatballs

Follow this simple method to make your own freezer meatballs! You can take out as many as you like at a time. You can use your favorite recipe, or you can use this grain-free, egg-free Italian Meatball recipe. Yum!

I share here how to make my gluten and grain free meatballs into freezer meatballs. I made a big bag of them, and we mostly used them to serve with spaghetti sauce over gluten free noodles (read this post for some of our favorite brands), or over spaghetti squash (read this post for a comparison of 4 grain free noodle options). I love having them available as they reheat so quickly. They help make great last minute meals.

2. Gluten Free Pizza Crust

I love how simple this gluten-free pizza is to make! I can finally enjoy pizza again!

These crusts are fantastic and easy to make with just whole soaked quinoa and coconut flour. I made enough crusts for our dinner one night, and a bunch extra to go into our freezer to reheat later. I used parchment paper to keep them separated when frozen, and it worked well. You could also make a massive batch of roasted vegetable to freeze for pizza toppings as well.

3.  Egyptian Lentil Soup with Caramelized Onions

Egyptian Red Lentil Soup with Caramelized Onions - This gentle, cumin-scented soup is topped with sweet caramelized onions, a drizzle of high-quality olive oil, and a blast of fresh lemon juice. It’s incredibly easy and surprisingly delicious considering how inexpensive it is to make.

This is one of our favorite (and most frugal) soup recipes from my soup cookbook, Ladled: Nourishing Soups for all Seasons. It freezes really well! Just freeze the caramelized onions separately.

4. Keema Matar (An amazing beef or lamb curry)

Need a simple but delicious dinner? This beef or lamb curry is very quick to make up, but is really delicious!

This delicious dish froze very well. I made it a little milder than usual so that if the heat increased after being frozen it wouldn’t get too hot for my kids. I love how flavorful this dish is.

5. Chicken and Vegetable Soup

simplechickennoodlesoup

I made a very concentrated chicken broth (get instructions here and here for chicken broth) with a whole chicken. Then I shredded the chicken and sautéed onions, celery, and carrots. I combined the vegetables with the chicken and broth and then separated into freezer bags for freezing. I purposely made my chicken broth concentrated so it wouldn’t take as much room in the freezer and then diluted it with water when heating up the soup. We would add gluten free noodles or white rice to this after defrosting it.

6. Hearty Beef Stew

autumn beef stew

We love beef stew! I used radishes instead of potatoes, and they were delicious and froze well (without tasting spicy, I promise!). While you can make up whatever beef stew is your favorite, I used our family favorite recipe from my soup cookbook, Ladled: Nourishing Soups for all Seasons. Another favorite is this Autumn Beef Stew.

7. Gluten Free Teriyaki Chicken

3 ingredient teriyaki panfried chicken (easiest recipe ever)

I didn’t flatten the chicken this time because it was so much work to do in mass, but instead kept the chicken thighs as they came. All you do is pour the sauce over the chicken and freeze! Because I choose not to flatten the chicken, I just popped it into a pan and baked it instead. Defrost as needed and serve with rice or cauliflower rice, and Japanese Cucumber Salad. Yum!

8. Lemon and Garlic Drumsticks

ng_lemondrumsticks

I also made up several dinners worth of this easy recipe. It also froze well and was very easy to put together in mass. I find that when I am nursing I need to eat a lot of protein, so I loved having this as a dinner main dish option.

Slow Cooker Pot Roast With Winter Vegetables

Melt-in-your-mouth tender pot roast, lightly seasoned, simmering in its own juices with the most delicious winter vegetables. This one pot meal takes minutes to put together, and your Crockpot does the rest!

By April Swiger, Contributing Writer

Melt-in-your-mouth tender pot roast, lightly seasoned, simmering in its own juices with the most delicious winter vegetables. This one pot meal takes minutes to put together and lasts our family of three at least three hearty meals. You definitely don’t want to skip the gravy for this one either! It’s the perfect topping for this hearty meal.

Our family has been slowly easing into a grain-free diet since the new year, and this recipe was the perfect addition to our weekly menu. I’ve always been a little intimidated to make pot roast on a regular basis for fear of it ending up dry or tasteless. It would be painful to waste such a big cut of meat! I decided to try a new recipe on Christmas Eve and it came out amazing. I couldn’t believe how delicious it was!

This was actually my first time experimenting with celeriac (or celery root). I saw it in our local market and remembered reading about it while researching the GAPS diet (something we’re slowly experimenting with as well). It has the flavor of celery, but a similar consistency to potatoes. It’s really tasty and would make a great mashed potato substitute as well. It was a lovely addition to my winter vegetable mix in this recipe.

I think what makes this roast so tender is that it cooks almost fully submerged in broth. It may seem like a lot of liquid (my #affilatelink 6 quart slow cooker is full to the top), but it truly makes the roast fall apart at the end. In addition, you have plenty of tasty meat/vegetable broth to use as your gravy base. Yum!

You could use any flour you like for the gravy, or arrowroot powder if you’re avoiding gluten. I typically used two cups of broth in a small saucepan, and whisked continuously as I add the flour to thicken. Season it with some salt and pepper, and you have a simple gravy that takes only minutes to prepare.

This recipe will likely make its way into my kitchen a few times a month. The leftover meat is delicious on a salad, sandwich, or topped with a big scoop of gravy.

Slow Cooker Pot Roast With Winter Vegetables
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main Dish
 
This melt-in-your-mouth pot roast, topped with delicious gravy, makes a hearty and nourishing meal any day of the week! You will have plenty of leftovers for roast beef sandwiches and salads.
Ingredients
  • 3-4 Lb Chuck Roast
  • 1 Onion, sliced thick
  • 4 Garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3-4 Small to medium potatoes, cut into large chunks
  • 3 carrots, peeled and cut into large chunks
  • 1 Celeriac root, cut into large chunks (you could also use parsnips, turnips, or celery)
  • 4 Cups beef broth (or a mixture of broth and water), enough to almost cover the roast
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • ½ tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp dried thyme
  • ½ tsp dried basil
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp onion powder
  • Flour, (or arrowroot powder to make it gluten free), to thicken the broth for gravy if desired
  • Salt and pepper to season the gravy to taste
Instructions
  1. Place the roast in the crockpot and prepare the vegetables. After everything is chopped, place them in the crockpot surrounding your roast.
  2. Measure out two cups of the broth (or broth and water mixture) and add all of the seasoning to it, stirring well. Pour the seasoned broth, and additional broth to almost cover the roast, into the crockpot.
  3. Set your crockpot on low for 8-10 hours, or 6-8 on high. When the roast is falling apart when poked with a fork, it’s done.
  4. To make the gravy, ladle out two cups of broth from the crockpot and place it in a small saucepan. Bring it to a simmer and add flour or arrowroot powder, one heaping tablespoon at a time, until it’s thickened to your liking. Whisk it continuously to get all the lumps out.

 

Creamy Chicken Paprikas (Comfort food all the way)

Chicken Paprikas is a flavorful, creamy comfort food! Serve over noodles of choice, including zucchini noodles for a lovely grain-free version. It's also dairy free!Today Naomi shares an incredibly delicious comfort food dish, Creamy Chicken Paprikas, that she thoughtfully made dairy free and grain free! My mouth waters just reading through her recipe. As a mom of a newborn, I love how simple this recipe is to make as well. Thanks so much Naomi! — Kimi 

By Naomi, from Almost Bananas

Although paprikas (pronounced paprikash) is originally of Hungarian origin, it is also commonly made in Slovakia, where I live. Sweet paprika is the key to this simple but delicious creamy sauce for chicken.

After a long spell, it has started to snow here again. Small flakes, whirling around in the wind, it’s amazing that they can add up to deep drifts.

The children press their noses to the windows, excited to see the white fluff falling. As soon as there is enough to play with, they dash outside. Its perfect snowball snow and children from the neighouring apartment buildings come out of the woodwork. A snowman with walnut eyes and buttons, snow forts loaded with snowballs, an igloo. I’m like a kid, kneeling in the snow to build a fort, pulling the toddler twins on the sled like a horse.

We think of winter as the time for comfort food, dishes that bring pleasure and contentment. The warmth, both physical and emotional, combats the cold outside, heating us up from our bellies.

Although its during below freezing weather that we come inside with flushed cheeks and stiff fingers, I find I crave comfort more during winters without snow, even if the temperature is warmer. Grey skies, grey trees, dull weather, dull everything. A warm meal shared around the table with family helps lift that dull grey mood.

Sometimes comfort food is food from childhood. Noodle filled broth based soups were always a part of my Japanese father’s winter lunches, similar to Miso Noodle Soup. Or it could be roast beef or lamb, surrounded by potatoes and carrots in Mom’s cast iron pot, preferably with our own mountain pastured meat.

Sometimes comfort food is new, but oh so satisfying. Slovak food, fortunately, is the epitome of this type of comfort food. Creamy Sauerkraut Stew, for example, makes use of the tradition of making sauerkraut during the winter. Strapacky is a dish of little dumplings baked with bacon and sauerkraut (I use potatoes, sweet potatoes, or cauliflower in place of dumplings for a faster and grain free meal). Bacon – doesn’t that make any dish a comfort food?

Paprikas fits the bill of comfort food as well. Any kind of chicken will do: you can cut up a whole chicken, use drumsticks and thighs, or just the breast meat. Normally heavy cream is called for, but for these photos I used coconut cream to see if it worked, and fortunately it does!

My mother in law serves paprikas over macaroni. You can use a variety of vegetable noodles, pasta, or grains to serve paprikas, from zucchini noodles to rice.

Other chicken recipes you may enjoy:

 
 
Ingredients
  • 1 Tbsp lard or other cooking fat
  • 1 large (200g) onion
  • 2 tbsp paprika
  • 3½ lbs (1.6 kg) chicken (I used chicken legs, wings, and breast. If you use only legs, use a little more; if only breast, use a little less)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup+ (250 ml+) bone broth or water
  • 1 cup (250 ml) heavy cream or coconut cream
  • 1 tbsp arrowroot (or thickener of choice)
Instructions
  1. Chop onion, add to melted cooking fat in a large pan (I used an enameled roasting pan). Cook over medium heat until translucent. Meanwhile, wash chicken. Cut up chicken breasts if using.
  2. Add paprika to onion, stir, and add chicken immediately. Paprika quickly burns and then becomes bitter.
  3. Add salt, bone broth or water, and simmer covered for about an hour (less for chicken breast). You will probably have to add extra liquid until the liquid is just below the level of the chicken.
  4. When ready to serve, pour in cream or coconut cream and stir. Mix arrowroot with a bit of milk or water, and pour into the dish, stirring around the chicken.
  5. Serve over zucchini noodles, riced cauliflower, or pasta or grains of choice.

 

avatarA Canadian transplanted to Slovakia, Naomi aims to cook real food and create an environmentally friendly and beautiful home for her family of six. The closest she’s come to her dream farm is growing tasty live bacteria on the counters. The simple life is an illusive ideal that she nevertheless contineus to strive toward, although two year old twins make sure it’s never boring. Naomi shares her food creations and photos of Slovakia at Almost Bananas. She looks forward to connecting with you on Pinterest, Facebook, and Instagram.