Stove Top Goat Cheddar Mac and Cheese (Gluten Free)

Gluten-Free Goat Cheddar Mac and Cheese - Kid friendly, and NO cow dairy! -Creamy and delicious. - The Nourishing Gourmet

Gluten-free noodles topped with an ultra creamy and mild cheese sauce that is free of any cow dairy, but rich and creamy with goat cheddar and chicken broth. Yum! This dish is gluten-free and cow dairy-free, but still has that lovely creamy flavor and perfect noodles that I loved as a child.

I’m glad that my children eat a variety of nourishing foods, including ones that I wouldn’t have ever eaten as a child ¬– foods like caviar and seaweed and dark greens. But sometimes it’s also fun to share nourishing versions of my favorite childhood dishes. And my favorite by far was mac and cheese. Growing up my mom would make big dishes of oven-baked mac and cheese. Yum!

The problem is that some of us don’t do well with cow dairy, and half the family is gluten-free. I had been tossing around the idea of making a goat cheddar mac and cheese recipe, but I was a little worried about how it would turn out. I finally took the plunge, and it came out wonderful!

Did you know that macaroni and cheese was a popular penny-pinching dish for a long time? I’ve read several references to it as such in old cookbooks – one of which was one that helped the poorest city folks know how to cook frugally for their families.

But I was very amused by the references to mac and cheese in the book, Below Stairsby Margaret Powell (Amazon links are affiliate).  Have you heard of it before? Margaret was born in 1907, and worked as a kitchen maid and later as a cook, and this book is her autobiography. Her book is supposed to have inspired both Upstairs, Downstairs, as well as Downton Abbey. I read it recently and enjoyed it. It must have been eye opening at the time for the upper class to see themselves through the perspective of one of the maids. Plus, Margaret has a witty and insightful writing style that makes this book so much fun!

For example, when talking about trying to find a husband, “Men are very susceptible to flattery. Even a man with a face like the back of a bus, if you tell him he doesn’t look too bad, believes you. You can stuff men up with any old yarn. They believe anything. You’ve only got to gaze into their eyes, and sound as though you mean what you say. I’ve tried it so I know it’s true.”

Or on cooking, “It’s a funny thing, but the less cooking you know how to do, the more competent you feel. It’s only when you know how to cook that it worries you when it goes wrong, because when you don’t know, you don’t know it’s gone wrong. The more experienced I got the more I worried. I soon realized when a dish wasn’t perfection. Not that I could have hoped to have a dish that was perfection at Lady Gibbons’ because even the best cook in the world can’t make a dish out of poor ingredients.”

The book is full of rich little nuggets like above that make this book a riot to read (but also full of human insight). And while reading the book, I noticed that my favorite dish was treated rather poorly. In pre-war times in the wealthy households that she worked in, mac and cheese was not held in high regard at all. Margaret describes how some of the households went through vast amounts of cream and meat and all sorts of good ingredients to make elaborate 12-course meals for their every dinner upstairs, while downstairs, the servants were fed far less scrumptious meals.

She says, “What we had at night were the left- overs of the day before or a macaroni cheese or welsh rarebit. It wasn’t Mrs. McIlroy’s fault [the cook], she wasn’t allowed to give us more. Some of the maids used to moan like mad and say they never got enough to eat. I didn’t moan, but I used to feel it wasn’t fair.“

What! My beloved mac and cheese snubbed by even the servants? But on second thought, considering we do all of our housework ourselves, I guess we are the servants of our household, and so it is fitting that we eat creamy and delicious poor man mac and cheese. 😉

If you, like me, accept humble fare instead of 12-course meals, I hope you’ll enjoy this lovely little dish. (And if you love books, check out Below Stairs ).

Goat Cheddar Cheese Sauce - Pour over noodles for mac and cheese OR over steamed vegetables. Yum! -- The Nourishing Gourmet

This creamy cheddar sauce is perfect not only noodles but also over steamed vegetables for a low-carb option (or just a very yummy vegetable side!). Try it with cauliflower!

Notes on the recipe:

  • I used the this gluten free pasta (they hold together well and taste great), but you can use whatever brand/kind you like. You can get them here on Amazon.
  • I didn’t use goat milk in this recipe to replace cow milk. Why? Goat milk tends to get more “goaty” in flavor when heated. I was nervous about using chicken broth as I was concerned it would be too thin, but it turned out great. I used store bought, and not homemade, but homemade would be even better.
  • You can make this into baked mac and cheese by putting the finished mac and cheese in a pan, and sprinkling with cheese and putting in a 350F oven for 20-25 minutes.
  • Make sure you use a mild cheese (not “goaty” cheddar) for this recipe.

Gluten-Free Goat Cheddar Mac and Cheese - Kid friendly, and NO cow dairy! -Creamy and delicious. - The Nourishing Gourmet

Other Recipes Based on Books:

Stove Top Goat Cheddar Mac and Cheese

Serves 4

Ingredients: 

  • 8 ounces of gluten free elbow noodles
  • 2 tablespoons butter of choice (Goat, sheep, or cow, if you can tolerate it) OR oil or fat of choice (you can try bacon grease too!)
  • 2 tablespoons tapioca flour (Or try arrowroot or organic corn starch)
  • 1 cup of chicken broth, homemade or store bought (made with real food ingredients)
  • 1 heaping teaspoon mustard powder
  • ½ pound of mild goat cheddar, grated
  • Unrefined salt
  • Pepper
  • Optional flavor addition: dried or fresh thyme, paprika, cayenne, fresh chives, diced cooked bacon

Directions:

1. Cook the noodles according to the packages instructions until JUST cooked (don’t overcook). Make sure you boil in salted water. Drain and rinse.

2. For the cheese sauce: In a large saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat, and whisk in the tapioca flour. Whisk for one to two minutes (don’t allow it to burn) and then slowly whisk in the broth. It should thicken almost immediately. Once it has thickened, add the goat cheddar, and stir until the goat cheddar has melted (about five minutes or so). Salt and pepper to taste. Add any flavor additions. The sauce should be on the verge of being too salty, as it will be diluted on the noodles.

3. Pour the noodles into the sauce, and gently fold into the cheese sauce. Serve right away and enjoy!

(To bake: Pour into a casserole dish, sprinkle with more cheddar cheese. Bake in a 350F oven for 20-25 minutes.)

Stove Top Goat Cheddar Mac and Cheese (Gluten Free)
 
 
Ingredients
  • 8 ounces of gluten free elbow noodles
  • 2 tablespoons butter of choice (Goat, sheep, or cow, if you can tolerate it) OR oil or fat of choice (you can try bacon grease too!)
  • 2 tablespoons tapioca flour (Or try arrowroot or organic corn starch)
  • 1 cup of chicken broth, homemade or store bought (made with real food ingredients)
  • 1 heaping teaspoon mustard powder
  • ½ pound of mild goat cheddar, grated
  • Unrefined salt
  • Pepper
  • Optional flavor addition: dried or fresh thyme, paprika, cayenne, fresh chives, diced cooked bacon
Instructions
  1. Cook the noodles according to the packages instructions until JUST cooked (don’t overcook). Make sure you boil in salted water. Drain and rinse.
  2. For the cheese sauce: In a large saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat, and whisk in the tapioca flour. Whisk for one to two minutes (don’t allow it to burn) and then slowly whisk in the broth. It should thicken almost immediately. Once it has thickened, add the goat cheddar, and stir until the goat cheddar has melted (about five minutes or so). Salt and pepper to taste. Add any flavor additions. The sauce should be on the verge of being too salty, as it will be diluted on the noodles.
  3. Pour the noodles into the sauce, and gently fold into the cheese sauce. Serve right away and enjoy!
  4. (To bake: Pour into a casserole dish, sprinkle with more cheddar cheese. Bake in a 350F oven for 20-25 minutes.)

 

White Hot Chocolate (Inspired by The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe)

This frothy and creamy white hot chocolate is dairy-free and made with healthy ingredients! It's inspired by The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, but it's lovely to enjoy with any book! -- The Nourishing Gourmet

By Katie Mae Stanley of Nourishing Simplicity

Rich and creamy, this dairy-free white hot chocolate transports you to the land of Narnia.

As winter melts into spring I can’t help but to think of the magical land of Narnia as it was right before Aslan returned, in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. It was a cold and bleak place, with no hope for the future, a world of never ending winter.

Edmund followed his sister Lucy through the wardrobe, unable to find her, he found himself alone and cold in the snowy woods.

To his surprise a “Queen” better known as the White Witch pulled up beside him in her sleigh. Once she realized he was a “son of Adam” she changed from harsh creature to a flattering and almost nurturing type. Despite Edmund’s trepidations he was beguiled but the promise of warmth, a hot drink, Turkish delight, and ultimately a kingdom.

Edmund felt much better as he began to sip the hot drink. It was something he has never tasted before, very sweet and foamy and creamy, and it warmed him right down to his toes

~C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe 

White Hot Chocolate Quote

I always wished that I could be Edmond just for a few minutes so I could savor the delicious, hot drink and Turkish Delight too!  It left me wondering what that very sweet and foamy and creamy could possibly be.

It couldn’t be classic hot cocoa since that was already popular in England. It occurred to me that it very well could be a white hot chocolate, which is oh so creamy, and not commonly drank at that time.

This is not your regular white hot chocolate made with the bars you see in the store, instead, it is made with cocoa butter. Cocoa butter gives the drink a smooth and creamy texture with just a hint of chocolate essence.

Curl up with your loved ones and this drink, to enjoy the story once again or for the very first time before winter melts into spring!

OTHER RECIPES INSPIRED BY BOOKS

Ingredients and Equipement: 

(Affiliate links)

White Hot Chocolate

Ingredients: 

  • 3 cups almond milk (or other milk/milk substitute)
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup or raw honey
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa butter, grated
  • 1 vanilla bean, caviar scraped out
  • 1/8 tsp unrefined salt

Directions:

1. Split the vanilla bean in half and scrape the caviar (insides) out with a sharp knife.

2. In a small sauce pot, combine the milk, maple syrup (honey), cocoa butter, vanilla, and salt. Warm over medium heat until the milk is warm and the cocoa butter is melted.

3. Pour into two mugs and froth with a milk frother if desired.

White Hot Chocolate (Inspired by The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe)
 
 
Ingredients
  • 3 cups almond milk (or other milk/milk substitute)
  • ¼ cup maple syrup or raw honey
  • 2 TBS cocoa butter
  • 1 vanilla bean, caviar scraped out
  • ⅛ tsp unrefined salt
Instructions
  1. Split the vanilla bean in half and scrape the caviar (insides) out with a sharp knife.
  2. In a small sauce pot, combine the milk, maple syrup (honey), cocoa butter, vanilla, and salt. Warm over medium heat until the milk is warm and the cocoa butter is melted.
  3. Pour into two mugs and froth with a milk frother if desired.

 

White Hot Chocolate Picture

AIP Cookbook Giveaway ($114 Value)

AIP Cookbook Giveaway - a wealth of resources! This diet is for those with autoimmune or gut issues, and is a healing protocol. This resource will help you learn about it, and give you the tools you need to succeed. -- The Nourishing Gourmet

The autoimmune protocol diet is a grain-free diet that goes beyond the general paleo diet to a healing protocol. It is used for any immune system issue, as well as for dealing with gut issues. The diet is free of eggs, nightshades, dairy, nuts, seeds, but full of anti-inflammatory vegetables, healthy fats, and proteins such as beef, seafood, and chicken. Sweet potatoes and plantains are allowed as well.

I have been on the AIP diet for a couple of months and have found it helpful. But with such a strict protocol, it is good to have some resources on hand if you are on the diet, of are considering it. Today, I am giving away three books. This is for those who are considering going on the AIP diet, are currently on the AIP diet, or would like to have these resources on your bookshelf.

Victory Belt Publishing (the publisher of my cookbook, Ladled: Nourishing Salads for all Seasons) is kindly providing copies of the below three books to one winner!

All of these books were written (or co-written) by Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D. from The Paleo Mom. (Amazon links are affiliate).

The Paleo Approach

Her first book, The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body
is an AIP bible, full of research on all of the details of the AIP diet. While you can look up brief outlines of the diet, this book will help you understand each part of the diet, and why the details are important. She also deals with specific topics such as food sensitivities and intolerances, SIBO, and other problems that may also need to be addressed. This is a big book, but worth the read, especially for those of us who like to understand deeply the reasoning, research, and logic behind what we are doing.

The Paleo Approach Cookbook

The second book is The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body. The Paleo Approach lays down the guidelines; this cookbook helps you have the recipes you need to heal. What I appreciate about this book is that it is very thorough, sharing recipes for everything from rendering tallow, to main dishes, to offal recipes (a part of the AIP diet many of us neglect), to dessert recipes. It’s kind of like the “Nourishing Traditions” cookbook of the AIP world.

The Healing Kitchen

The third book is probably my favorite, The Healing Kitchen: 175+ Quick and Easy Paleo Recipes to Help You Thrive. This beautiful book gives easy and quick recipes that are delicious as well as AIP. I’ve tried several recipes from this book so far, and each one has been a success (I like the Oven Baked Pancakes, Beef Pot Pie, and the Cinnamon Raisin Porridge). I know that many of my readers here have also mentioned that this was one of their favorite AIP cookbooks, and I think that its popularity is well deserved.

This giveaway is open to anyone, and will be open until the 29th of February. The Winner will be picked using Random.org, and will be announced March 1st. The winner will be emailed and given five days to get back to me. If I haven’t heard from them, I will draw a new winner. (Make sure you use the correct email address when you enter, so I can get a hold of you! You will NOT be added to any email list when you enter this giveaway. 🙂 )
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Gluten-free Dough Cakes (Inspired by The Secret Garden)

This family-pleasing flat bread will bring the smell of a Victorian cottage to your kitchen!

By Andrea Fabry of It Takes Time

You, like Dickon, will love these Dough Cakes. A gluten-free dough is gently patted into discs and enriched with butter and sweetener. Fifteen minutes later these lovely lightly sweetened cakes emerge from the oven ready for tea time.

These Victorian-era Dough Cakes are based on the book The Secret Garden, by Francis Hodgson Burnett. Dough cakes are made from old fashioned cottage loaves, a favorite of English “cottagers”.

The Secret Garden is one of my favorite children’s book. It’s filled with references to natural health, extolling the benefits of fresh air, clean water, and wholesome food.

In Chapter eight, Martha, Mary Lennox’s  good-natured maid, and companion, offers a glimpse into the life of a poor, loving family.

Martha recounts her recent visit to her home and tells Mary about the delicious Dough Cakes she and her mother prepared for each of the 12 children.

“I had’em all pipin’ hot when they came in from playin’ on the’ moor. An’ th’ cottage all smelt o’nice, clean hot bakin’ an’ there was a good fire, an’ they just shouted for joy. Our Dickon he said our cottage was good enough for a king.”

Text from The Secret Garden

What is a Dough Cake?

Dough Cakes rely on bread dough taken from cottage loaf dough, a rustic Victorian bread made in the bottom of a brick oven.

Amy Cotler, the author of The Secret Garden Cookbook, describes Dough Cakes this way:

“Stotty cake or oven bottom cakes were often made for a quick meal. Pieces were pulled off the bread dough; they were flattened and baked quickly at the bottom of the oven for 20 minutes, then split and buttered for served with bacon. As there was plenty of bread dough on hand, cottagers baked small pieces and filled them with brown sugar for a special treat. ”

This recipe can be adapted to suit any preference. Add some sweetener and cinnamon to the dough for even more flavor!

Resources:

(Amazon links affiliate)

Other Recipes Inspired by Books

 Dough-Cakes

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups of your favorite bread dough. (Since we’re grain-free I rely on my Gluten-free Sourdough Quinoa Bread which uses kombucha as a starter. Find the recipe here.)
  • 2 teaspoons butter or ghee.
  • 4 teaspoons sweetener of choice. (We use Monk Fruit sweetener)

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

2. Divide dough into four portions.

3. With your hands, pat each portion into a flat disk and place on parchment lined baking sheet.

4. Use a spoon or your thumb to make a slight indentation in the center of each.

5. Drop 1 teaspoon sweetener into each indentation and top with 1/2 teaspoon of butter.

6. Let rest for 15 minutes

7. Bake the cakes on the lowest oven rack until dough is browned and cooked through. (Approximately 15 minutes.)

Serve warm.

Makes four medium Dough Cakes.

Gluten-free Dough Cakes (Inspired by The Secret Garden)
 
Author:
Serves: 4 medium Dough Cakes
 
Ingredients
  • 1.5 cups of your favorite gluten-free bread dough
  • 2 teaspoons butter or ghee
  • 4 teaspoons sweetener or sweetener alternative
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Divide dough into four sections.
  3. With your hands, pat each portion into a flat disk and place on parchment lined baking sheet.
  4. Use a spoon or your thumb to make a slight indentation in the center of each.
  5. Drop 1 teaspoon sweetener into each indentation and top with ½ teaspoon of butter.
  6. Let rest for 15 minutes.
  7. Bake the cakes on the lowest oven rack until dough is browned and cooked through.
  8. Serve warm.