Buckwheat Pancakes (Inspired by The Long Winter)

Buckwheat Pancakes

By Katie Mae, of Nourishing Simplicity

Fluffy buckwheat pancakes dripping with butter and brown sugar syrup are the perfect winter breakfast.

The Little House Books by Laura Ingalls Wilder are near and dear to my heart. My mom had read the series twice through to us by the time I was eight and I read them as my first “big books” when I was nine. To this day they are my favourite children’s series.

I love the stories Laura wove of her family’s adventures and trials as pioneers, making their stamp in history.

I am and always have been drawn to the passages about the food they prepared. The stories are a traditional foodie’s dream as they transport you back to a day when it was common knowledge that cows should eat grass that produces rich yellow cream, that freshly rendered lard should a kitchen staple, and that white sugar is only for special treats.

Over the years, I have created many recipes inspired by Laura’s famous classics such as lemonade, sourdough biscuits, and corn meal mush. One I recently added to my repertoire is buckwheat pancakes. Buckwheat pancakes were a meal that Laura’s future husband Almanzo and his brother Royal served Pa when he braved the bitter cold in the book “The Long Winter” to buy wheat for his starving family.

Almazno and Royal were eating supper. Almazno had stacked the pancakes with brown sugar and he had made plenty of them. Royal had eaten halfway down his stack, Almonzo was nearing the bottom of his, and one tall stack of two dozen pancakes, dripping melted brown sugar, was standing untouched when Pa knocked at the door.

“Come in, Mr, Ingalls! Sit up and gave some pancakes with us!” Royal invited him.

“You boys certianly live in the lap of luxury,” Pa remarked. The pancakes were no ordinary buckwheat pancakes. Almazno followed his mother’s pancake rule and the cakes were light as foam, soaked through with melted brown sugar”

The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder

I may not know Mother Wilder’s secret but these delightful buckwheat pancakes are still light as foam. The lightness comes from the overnight soaking, and the baking soda interacting with the acid in the yogurt (or other soaking medium).

Buckwheat pancakes have a decided tang that comes from the grain itself. For this recipe, I used  part freshly ground buckwheat and part freshly ground whole wheat flour. You can use only buckwheat for a gluten-free option but the pancakes will not be a light. These are perfect paired withAlmanzo’s favourite fried apples and onions and breakfast sausage.

Fix yourself a plate and dive in while enjoying the warmth of your home, instead of a tiny claim shanty like Laura’s family lived in.

Resources:

(Amazon links are affiliate) 

Buckwheat Pancakes Inspired by The Long Winter

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups buckwheat flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups yogurt/buttermilk/dairy kefir/coconut milk kefir
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons sucanat (or unrefined sweetener of choice)
    1 teaspoons baking soda
    1/2 teaspoons unrefined salt

Directions:

1, In a large mixing bowl combine the two flours, yogurt, and water. Mix thoroughly and cover with a cloth. Allow the batter to set on the counter for 12 to 24 hours.

2. Add the sucanat, eggs, baking soda, and salt to the batter. Mix until smooth.

3. Heat a large skillet (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Pour the batter on the skillet to create the size pancakes desired.

4. Allow the cakes to cook for about two minutes or until bubbles form over the cake. Flip the cake and cook on the other side for about one minute.

5. Repeat until all the batter has been used.

For The Love of Food and Books- Buckwheat Pancakes Inspired by The Long Winter
 
Author:
 
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups buckwheat flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups yogurt/buttermilk/dairy kefir/coconut milk kefir
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 TBS sucanat
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp unrefined salt
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl combine the two flours, yogurt, and water. Mix thoroughly and cover with a cloth. Allow the batter to set on the counter for 12 to 24 hours.
  2. Add the sucanat, eggs, baking soda, and salt to the batter. Mix until smooth.
  3. Heat a large skillet (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Pour the batter on the skillet to create the size pancakes desired.
  4. Allow the cakes to cook for about two minutes or until bubbles form over the cake. Flip the cake and cook on the other side for about one minute.
  5. Repeat until all the batter has been used.

 

The following two tabs change content below.
Katie Mae Stanley is the writer at Nourishing Simplicity, where the focus is on nourishing foods, herbal remedies, simple living, and faith. Ethnic and Midwest foods are always a favorite in her kitchen and on her blog. She is also the author of the book Steeped: Simple Nourishing Teas and Treats. Katie Mae spent 10 years as a missionary dorm "mama" for over 30 amazing deaf girls at a school for the deaf in Baja California, Mexico. Now she finds herself state side ready to embrace God's next adventure. A cup of tea or coffee and a bit of dark chocolate make an appearance at some point in any given day.

Latest posts by Katie Mae (see all)

Comments

  1. Becky says

    I LOVE buckwheat pancakes and waffles. Sounds very interesting to do the ferment. I am gluten intolerant however and would sub almond and coconut flours with maybe some arrowroot; would the ferment work with these flours or does it require wheat to work? Also I am unable to view any comments left for this recipe so have been unable to ascertain if this question was already answered. Please let me know how to see others comments. TY for investing in Yourself and others, Becky

    • says

      I have never tried to do a ferment overnight so I am not sure. The structure of those “flours” are very different. To play it safe I would skip that step. The yogurt or whatever you chose to use would still react to the baking powder to create a lighter texture. I have never used that blend before, so I am not able to guarantee positive results.

      I’m not sure why the comments were not working before, you are the first person to ask the question. 🙂

  2. lili says

    Hei. I did this pancakes. I have a question. After leaving the flour mix bowl for 16 hours. It didn’t change? Should I see something different?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *