Natural Egg Replacements for Baking

We had our daughter tested for food intolerances last year, and her reaction to egg were skyrocket high. (Thankfully, she doesn’t react to the majority of food she eats on a regular basis, which is a sign that her gut is in good shape). She is slightly intolerant to gluten, so we have been keeping her gluten-free for the most part. Gluten-free and egg-free makes for some interesting baking, but it can be successful (the above picture is egg-free, gluten-free, dairy-free pancakes – and they were yummy too!).

When you combine the gluten-free and the egg-free together, it does become a little more complicated, but today I wanted to share some of the substitutes you can make for egg-free baking. I’ve been filing these suggestions away, and thought some of you might find them helpful too! Thankfully, there are many good substitutes. And, for those of you who also have to bake “egg-free”, I’d love to hear your experience and advice.

There are two things to consider when replacing eggs, the “lift” eggs give a product and egg’s binding properties. Some of the following don’t help give good rise, but do bind. You may want to add about 1/2 teaspoon more baking powder per recipe to help prevent it from being too dense.  Most of these options are vegan as well.

Per egg:

Seeds: 1 tablespoon ground or whole chia or flax seed soaked in 3 tablespoons of water for 15 minutes.

Fruit and squash: ¼ cup mashed ripe banana, mashed avocado, cooked winter squash, mashed potatoes, pureed prunes, applesauce, or other fruit puree.

Starch: Anything starchy will help bind a baked good together. This includes arrowroot powder (most natural), corn starch (use organic, or GMO-free), or potato starch (I have been experimenting with potato flour, since it is a “whole food”). Use 2 tablespoons per egg.

Gelatin or agar-agar: Unflavored Gelatin: Dissolve 1 tablespoon gelatin in 1 tablespoon of cold water. Beat in 2 tablespoons of boiling water until frothy. OR 1 tablespoon of agar agar powder +1 tablespoon of water; whip, chill and whip again – equals 1 egg. (Use agar-agar for vegan option)

 Vinegar and baking powder: To help add rise, you can try the following: 1 tsp baking powder + 1 TBS water + 1 TBS vinegar.

The above are all ingredients I feel comfortable adding to my food. The following options I haven’t researched yet (if you have any information to give, please do!)

Ener-G Egg replacement (gluten-free): Follow package instructions

Xanthan gum: Whip together 1/4 teaspoon of xanthan gum in 1/4 cup water

I’ve mostly used chia seeds and squash or fruit purees. I have been trying to avoid any “extra” ingredients, but I do find that arrowroot or other starch really helps with gluten-free baked goods, though not necessary in regular, egg-free wheat products. While this has been working well for me, I do find that the end result is a bit heavy. Not a problem in our family (my daughter really doesn’t notice), but I have been working on a baked donut recipe for her birthday that we will be sharing with friends, so I am experimenting to see if I can make it a bit lighter in texture.

We have truthfully been mostly sticking to making pots of rice and quinoa to eat, rather than concentrating on the more time consuming task of baked goods. But, every kid needs pancakes or a cupcake sometimes!

 Does anyone bake egg-free? I’d love to hear your advice/experience/thoughts!

 

 

 

 

 

KimiHarris

I love beautiful and simple food that is nourishing to the body and the soul. I wrote Fresh: Nourishing Salads for All Seasons and Ladled: Nourishing Soups for All Seasons as another outlet of sharing this love of mine. I also love sharing practical tips on how to make a real food diet work on a real life budget. Find me online elsewhere by clicking on the icons below!

Comments

  1. Corry says

    I thought I read something somewhere about being able to boil the root of common mallow, and then use the resulting liquid to replace egg white? Not sure how exactly, but I thought that would be really cool, if true, since it’s a common weed.

  2. Tina says

    Hi,
    We’ve been on GAPs for a few years…it’s really a way of life for us now.
    My youngest was VERY allergic to eggs, my middle child was also allergic to
    Eggs when we first started on GAPs diet. We also have gluten, peanut, Tree nut
    And most common seed allergies so we can’t use flax seed, chia etc.
    My little didn’t do well with the energ replacer at all. We generally stick to either mashed banana or butternut squash for egg replacing, sometimes even just coconut oil for baking etc.
    Something very interesting that we found out about egg allergies is that they often go together with soy allergies, as in our case. My middle can eat pasture raised organically fed chicken eggs if the chickens are fed organic feed NOT containing soy, but she reacts to soy fed eggs even if they are organically fed. My youngest can’t eat organic chicken eggs, but can eat guinea fowl eggs. Interstingly enough, they both used to be ok with duck eggs, but then started reacting. I recently found out the person we were buying duck eggs from had switched to commercial feed containing commercial soy (GMO) because of the cost, and that is when they started reacting to the duck eggs.
    Studies do show that soy passes into the eggs so may be that is part of the allergen issue.
    T~

  3. Tina says

    Hi,
    We’ve been on GAPs for a few years…it’s really a way of life for us now.
    My youngest was VERY allergic to eggs, my middle child was also allergic to
    Eggs when we first started on GAPs diet. We also have gluten, peanut, Tree nut
    And most common seed allergies so we can’t use flax seed, chia etc.
    My little didn’t do well with the energ replacer at all. We generally stick to either mashed banana or butternut squash for egg replacing, sometimes even just coconut oil for baking etc.
    Something very interesting that we found out about egg allergies is that they often go together with soy allergies, as in our case. My middle can eat pasture raised organically fed chicken eggs if the chickens are fed organic feed NOT containing soy, but she reacts to soy fed eggs even if they are organically fed. My youngest can’t eat organic chicken eggs, but can eat guinea fowl eggs. Interstingly enough, they both used to be ok with duck eggs, but then started reacting. I recently found out the person we were buying duck eggs from had switched to commercial feed containing commercial soy (GMO) because of the cost, and that is when they started reacting to the duck eggs.
    Studies do show that soy passes into the eggs so may be that is part of the allergen issue.
    T~

  4. Stephanie says

    Hi, I have a son who is allergic to wheat and egg whites. I often make him normal muffin recipes except i use half oat flour and half light buckwheat or brown rice flour. I usually use the ener-g replacer and flax seeds instead of the eggs. I also sub honey for the sugar. Using a baked donut recipe sounds like a great idea, the past few times I tried to fry wheat free egg free donuts, they have all flown apart in the oil !

  5. Michelle says

    I have used Ener-G with OK results and the chia seed with great results but just realized that was in wheat-contains products. I have to cook egg and dairy free for my boys and I, egg, dairy, peanut and gluten free for my niece and now reducing the gluten and yeast in my own diet. Makes for some interesting cooking. :)

  6. Kika says

    Yes, we bake egg-free b/c my youngest is allergic to them. I almost always simply remove the egg and add about an equivalent amount of apple sauce. It is true that our pancakes are less fluffy but we are used to them. Cookies, muffins, loaves all work just fine this way although can be a tad crumblier. The trick is to add sufficient moisture to the recipe as seen in vegan recipes. The one treat that I think just doesn’t work egg-free is brownies :)

  7. Merrie-Ann says

    We started our journey as egg free in 2004 and are now milk, egg, nuts, halibut, sesame and corn syrup free. Wanting to try gluten free as it really helps my IBS. This is my favourite egg substitute: 1-1/2 tbsp oil; 1-1/2 tbsp water; 1 tsp baking powder. Mix together until it fizzes and then add it to your recipe.

  8. Kat says

    Ener G does make things more fluffy… It even works in meatloaf but if replacing more than 2 eggs in any recipe you’ll have to be careful with egg subs.

  9. says

    Yep – we are allergic to eggs (except now that I’m reading the comments, I’m suspecting it might be soy feed fed to the chickens). I use either fruit (applesace, banana, pumpkin) or chia eggs (ground chia + water). Those work for us in most instances. Except for something like quiche. =)

  10. says

    Interesting comments about the soy and egg links. I’ll have to look into it for my sons have issues with soy and eggs. We’re a house free of gluten, dairy, eggs, soy, nuts, vanilla, maple, kiwi fruit, so far!

    I’ve been experimenting with bakes. Remember the soft, spongy and fluffy kind of yester-gluten-year? Well, like someone else wrote above, anymore than 2 eggs is a risk for disaster of gummy and gooey. More like a sticky pudding, which can be useful if that’s what you’re after. However, replace 1 – 2 eggs with a replacer of your choice and then replace 1/2 – 1 cup of the liquid (milk or water) in the recipe with a soft drink / soda / fizzy drink. It doesn’t have to be a sugar laden one, you can still use soda water. I do. I add maybe a tablespoon of sugar if I’m making my own cake mix (because I try not to make the cakes too sweet), but leave it out if using a packet mix.

    The egg replacers give the mix the binding ability, but the soda water give the leavening agents that boost that’s lacking with regular cake mixes. Try it and tell me how you go!

    I miss brownies and yummy vanilla custards! Actually, I miss SOOOOOO MUCH! :O
    But I enjoy learning heaps about food too! :)

  11. Vivian says

    OMG! soooo helpfull! my kid can not eat eggs and we just star a glutten free lifestyle. Thank u for this SO great tip. I’m from Venezuela!

  12. says

    My stepson is allergic to eggs, and we have played this out every way we can find. For us, we have learned to use bananas, applesauce, fat free sweetened condensed milk (when we use this we omit the sugar the recipe calls for) but one of our new favorites we have found was yogurt. My stepdaughter and I tinkered and found that if we use yogurt (and sometimes one of the other items listed above) we still get the rise from most baked goods, and you can’t tell its egg free. Sometimes the taste is far better than when it has the eggs in it!

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