How to Cold Brew Coffee

Cold brew coffee makes a smooth, non-bitter coffee that is especially perfect for iced coffee. I shared this over at Mnn.com the other week, but it’s such a favorite I thought I should share it here too. Whether you should drink coffee or not from a health perspective is up to debate, but if you are going to drink coffee this is a lovely way to do it.

Coffee never really appealed to me. At least, that’s what I thought. Cold-brew coffee is what first won me over and now I enjoy coffee made a variety of ways. There are both health benefits and disadvantages to drinking coffee, but that aside, I have discovered a love for coffee, and it all started with cold-brew coffee last year. If you are looking for a smooth cup of Joe, then this is an excellent method.

Plus, it is so simple! You leave coffee in water for 12 hours or more, and then you strain it. You now have a coffee concentrate that will last at least a week. What more can you ask for? The advantages of cold brewing coffee, as I see it, are as follows.

1. It is simple and easy to do.
2. It is less acidic, which many people find helpful on the stomach.
3. There is less caffeine per cup when cold brewed.
4. The cold-brew method is less bitter, which promotes a smooth flavor.
5. The cold-brew method allows a different flavor profile to appear. Without as much bitterness, the fruity, chocolate, vanilla or other undertones are allowed to shine. So, even if you like a good cup of drip coffee, cold brewed coffee can give you a wonderful variation.

I make this the most simple way possible with a mason jar (like these ones from my Amazon affiliate). But you can also use some of the great cold brew systems out there to make the process even simpler. The Toddy was the first system, but this one is a lot more classy, and this Bodum one looks great too!

Here is how I make mine. The amount of coffee to water can be tweaked to preference. A good rule of thumb is 1/3 cup of ground coffee to 1 cup of water. I make batches of 4 cups, but you can certainly make less or a lot more by using the same ratio.

Cold Brew Coffee

1 1/3 cup of fresh finely ground coffee (Even cheap coffee tastes good using this method, but I recommend buying organic coffee beans, since coffee is a highly sprayed crop. I personally lean toward a medium roast bean)
4 cups of filtered water

1. Combine ground coffee and water in a mason jar or French press. Stir to combine well. Cover and leave for at least 8 hours, and up to 24 hours at room temperature.

2. Put a coffee filter in a fine sieve over a small mixing bowl or 4 cup measuring cup. Slowly pour coffee through the filter. This is your coffee concentrate.

3. Keep refrigerated. To serve, dilute to preference. A one-to-two ratio is common (one-third coffee concentrate, two-thirds water). For a stronger cup of coffee, use a one-to-one ratio. I like to add a little almond milk. My husband likes to add a tablespoon or two of organic cream and just a little sweetener.

It will keep at least one week.

Yield: 4 cups of concentrate (makes at least 8 cups of coffee).

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I love beautiful and simple food that is nourishing to the body and the soul. I wrote Fresh: Nourishing Salads for All Seasons and Ladled: Nourishing Soups for All Seasons as another outlet of sharing this love of mine. I also love sharing practical tips on how to make a real food diet work on a real life budget. Find me online elsewhere by clicking on the icons below!

Comments

  1. Papa Black says

    Most of these comments are a little too off-the-wall and “green” for me, so forgive me if I missed something: how long can you keep coffee grinds in water of cold brewing systems?

    • George Tollefson says

      The author mentions in the article that 24 hours is the max. I haven’t heard anything from other sources.

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