Iced Chamomile Lavender Tea

This tea is floral, sweet, and relaxing. When iced, it makes the perfect drink when sitting out in the sun on a lazy day. It is those simple pleasures (sun and iced tea) that can make for a lovely moment. For a family on a tighter budget with a husband in school, it is good to remind myself how frugal relaxation can be.

We recently saw a couple of days that spoke of summer, instead of spring. A hot sun heated our house, beated on our brow, and brightened our hearts. But I quickly found that I needed to find some cooling recipes to deal with the warm weather.

This iced tea is simple to make, and quite refreshing and relaxing. Chamomile is a traditional remedy for insomnia, and others find it helpful in treating migraine headaches (when drunk at the first symptom). It also has antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory properties that can be helpful in treating stomachaches and helping with irritable bowel syndrome.

Along the same lines, lavender is traditionally known to be helpful for treating insomnia because of it’s relaxing properties. It can also be helpful in treating an upset stomach and alleviating headaches.

Not only does lavender and chamomile have similar properties, but it also tastes wonderful together! My only warning is for those pregnant; Chamomile could have an abortive effect.

I used honey to sweeten this tea. Honey has a mild floral taste (especially certain types) and so honey works wonderfully in this application. I used Tao of Tea Chamomile and Lavender tea. You can make your own blend by combining dried chamomile and lavender. Traditional Medicinals also has an organic chamomile tea with lavender that would work well.

Iced Chamomile Lavender Tea

    3 heaping teaspoons of chamomile lavender tea blend
    2 cups of water
    2-4 teaspoons of a honey

1. Heat 2 cups of water to boil.
2. In a heat-safe container, brew the chamomile and lavender mixture in the boiling water for about 3 minutes. Remove. Stir in honey, to taste. Pour over ice and serve. Serves 1-2

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I love beautiful and simple food that is nourishing to the body and the soul. I wrote Fresh: Nourishing Salads for All Seasons and Ladled: Nourishing Soups for All Seasons as another outlet of sharing this love of mine. I also love sharing practical tips on how to make a real food diet work on a real life budget. Find me online elsewhere by clicking on the icons below!

Comments

  1. Heather says

    I do a continuous brew kombucha and am sipping chamomile lavender flavored kombucha right now! It is a great combination! I find it actually gives a little extra fizz to the kombucha, kind of like ginger does, though I’m not sure why. (Using dried herbs in a bottled secondary ferment.)

    • Joan Smith says

      Thanks, Heather, I just recently started drinking my continuous brew, can’t wait to try it with this tea combination.

    • Jennifer W says

      Heather, I am new to kombucha making. Do you strain out the dried herbs after adding them to the secondary ferment (before drinking)? Sorry if this is a dumb question…

      • Heather says

        Hi – yes, as Katie mentioned, I usually strain the dried herbs and pour the kombucha into a glass, unless I want to take the bottle to go or not dirty a glass – in which case I don’t drink the herbs, but just deal with it using my lips/teeth as a filter. :)

    • Joan Smith says

      I bought Traditional Medicinals Chamomile Lavender tea bags and dropped 2 in about a quart of kombucha and let it step a few days. Wow, I had no idea how delicious it would be. And then, the next time I added a handful of fresh assorted mint leaves. Mmmmm, drinking some now! What other teas should I try? Thanks

  2. Valerie Josephson says

    Kimmi,
    sounds so refreshing and delicious, but I have to disagree with you on one point. Chamomile is a perfectly safe herb. any normal pregnancy would not be effected at all by drinking chamomile. you would have to have a strong propensity for miscarriage, and drink a whole heck of a lot of chamomile for it to have an abortive effect, and even that would be very, very unlikely. I mean no disrespect, I just don’t want a whole bunch of pregnant women to have another phobia to worry about, there are too many of those out there. a cup of chamomile tea will never be the cause of a miscarriage.

    • KimiHarris says

      Hey Valerie,

      No offense taken. I am aware that there is some debate over chamomile and pregnancy. And I definitely agree that a cup of chamomile tea is unlikely to cause anyone to miscarry. However, many of us (I would be in this group), can find a beverage that we like and consume several cups-or more- of it everyday without even thinking of it. Sometimes because a food or herb is in the “good-for-you” category, we don’t consider that it in large amounts could have unintended consequences. Example: A nursing friend who ate a portion of raw cabbage everyday for it’s health benefits. She couldn’t figure out why her nursing infant was hungry all the time until she realized that the cabbage she was eating was reducing her milk supply. I had something similar happen with a supplement my midwives gave me that contained mint. The mint reduced my milk supply. There are many other examples of this type of thing.

      The point is, I understand your concern that I could be adding a phobia to already nervous mothers, I like to be informed about possible contradictions in herbs and foods. For that reason, I pass on any information I have when I can. For me, I’d drink a cup here and there of chamomile tea when pregnant, but I wasn’t going to drink a big mason jar of it everyday, especially as I easily went into contractions. Moderation is, as always, key. :-)

  3. says

    Hi Kimi,
    I find chamomile tea also to be very relaxing so combined with the lavander it’s got to be a great sleepy time beverage. Anytime I drink chamomile tea when I’m around my mother-on-law (from Spain) she immediately thinks I have a stomach problem. She only drinks it for that purpose, and I have used it for that purpose with good results.

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