Pennywise Platter Thursday 9/2

pennywiseplatter
Well, I wanted to link to everyone’s post last week, because they were all great, but I’m going to mention Living in Cincinnati’s recipe for Zuchinni and Cheese Frittata because I love how simple and cheap it is. Also, Ren as always has a gourmet but frugal and nourishing meal for you with his Salmon Casserole en Croute. Looks so beautiful!

So what nourishing and frugal recipes and tips do you have for me today? As always leave your addition in the comment section of this post. Can’t wait to see what you have for us all!

For guidelines go here and please format your entry in the comment section like the following and remember to link back to this post. Thanks!

Kimi @ The Nourishing Gourmet Five Healthy and Frugal Meals (http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2009/07/five-frugal-and-healthy-meals.html) Today I share five meals that are healthy, easy and frugal. They also happen to be family standby’s so you know they’ve been “family approved”. Check them out!

Pennywise Platter Thursday

Kimi @ The Nourishing Gourmet Can Tomatoes: Spend Time, Save Money
This week I share about my adventure in canning tomatoes and how it saved me a significant amount of money. I would love to hear your thoughts on canning as well!

Amanda @ the Rebuild blog: Freezing versus Canning
This week I share food science information on the nutrient loss in freezing and canning. This info may liberate you from a very hot summertime kitchen.

Kimi Notes: I am so glad that Amanda did this post this week, in light of my post on canning tomatoes. I should have mentioned earlier that I only can tomatoes (and not other vegetables and fruits) because of the issues that Amanda brings up. Way to go Amanda! I love her idea to dry tomatoes too. I was going to freeze some of my tomatoes as well, but now I think I am going to have to dry some too! Why didn’t I think of that?

Ren @ Edible Aria Huevos Rancheros, Salsa de Aji Mirasol Asado

We love our salmon casserole around here – thanks so much for the mention, and thank you again for hosting! If you’ve never made roasted salsa from scratch before, you owe it to yourself to try it – you just can’t buy anything this good in a store. This dish is easy and inexpensive enough to feed the whole gang.
Fresh, pastured eggs poached in roasted tomato salsa with tortillas hot off the comal. Garlic, cumin, Aji Mirasol (a Peruvian chile whose name means “looking at the sun”) and…

Ali @ The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen:
This post has tips for picking and storing fresh fruit. We save hundreds, if not thousands of dollars every year by picking our own fruit around town. We freeze nearly all of it, dehydrate quite a bit, and eat the rest fresh. I usually also can applesauce. This year I made a few batches of jam because our garage freezer was too full! Also included is a recipe for gluten-free, dairy-free peach/blueberry muffins. 🙂

Michele, from the comment section, shares a lovely crockpot Refried Bean recipe using bacon and garlic. Yummy.

Emily @ Life in Cincinnati Homemade Ranch Seasoning Mix
Save money and avoid preservatives & chemicals (no MSG either!) by making your own ranch mix. This makes a delicious veggie dip that tastes just like Hidden Valley, perhaps even a little better

Katie @ Kitchen Stewardship Pasta salad is a famous summer favorite. For an easy, less expensive, whole grain upgrade and a delicious cold summer side dish, please see my recipe for cold spelt salad.

Local Nourishment
Delicious late summer fruits and veggies come together for a cooling summer salad:

Cara Sweet potato fries are a frugal nutritious side dish that are always a hit with my children.

Anila-Fresh local produce is great for making shepherds pie.

Kara

I wrote this week about how eating a healthy, whole-foods diet doesn’t cost as much as most people seem to think.

Elizabeth @ A Modern Gal

I just posted on how to use up some of the wonderful summer fruit:

Frugal and Healthy Frozen Desserts

Glad to have found y’all!

And now’s it your turn!

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I love beautiful and simple food that is nourishing to the body and the soul. I wrote Fresh: Nourishing Salads for All Seasons and Ladled: Nourishing Soups for All Seasons as another outlet of sharing this love of mine. I also love sharing practical tips on how to make a real food diet work on a real life budget. Find me online elsewhere by clicking on the icons below!

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Comments

  1. says

    Ren @ Edible Aria Huevos Rancheros, Salsa de Aji Mirasol Asado

    We love our salmon casserole around here – thanks so much for the mention, and thank you again for hosting!

    If you’ve never made roasted salsa from scratch before, you owe it to yourself to try it – you just can’t buy anything this good in a store. This dish is easy and inexpensive enough to feed the whole gang.

    Fresh, pastured eggs poached in roasted tomato salsa with tortillas hot off the comal. Garlic, cumin, Aji Mirasol (a Peruvian chile whose name means “looking at the sun”) and…

  2. says

    Ali @ The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen: http://www.nourishingmeals.com/2009/09/honey-kissed-peach-or-blueberry-muffins.html

    This post has tips for picking and storing fresh fruit. We save hundreds, if not thousands of dollars every year by picking our own fruit around town. We freeze nearly all of it, dehydrate quite a bit, and eat the rest fresh. I usually also can applesauce. This year I made a few batches of jam because our garage freezer was too full! Also included is a recipe for gluten-free, dairy-free peach/blueberry muffins. 🙂

  3. Michele says

    Okay, I don’t have a website or even a blog, but I made a batch of crock pot “refried” beans a few days ago and thought I would share it. This is SUPER frugal and lends itself to lots of different uses. Not to mention embarassingly easy.

    Crock Pot “Refried” beans

    (I live in Southern California and these taste just like the beans you get at any good taco shop, just less greasy and more frugal!)

    2 cups organic dry pinto beans
    1 onion, quartered
    2 cloves garlic, halved
    2 pieces bacon (I use Niman Ranch, applewood smoked) coarsely chopped

    Soak the beans overnight.

    In the morning, drain the water, rinse the beans and add fresh water, enough to cover the beans by about 2 inches. Add the rest of the ingredients.

    Turn the crock pot on, cook on high for 6-8 hours.

    When the beans are tender, take the crock out of the heating element and drain off most of the water. Drain all of it if you like thick beans, leave about an inch if you like them soupy, you get the idea. You can always add water back in if they’re too thick for your liking.

    Using an immersion blender, blend the beans to desired smoothness. Voila! you can eat them now or replace the crock in the heating element and heat on low for up to 2 more hours. I made this and my family of four ate it as a side for dinner one night, I combined it with scrambled eggs and cheese for a breakfast burrito the next morning and then used the rest to fill tacos with for lunch the day after. Yum!!

    • KimiHarris says

      Hey Michele,

      Thanks for sharing your nourishing frugal recipe! Sounds great. 🙂 I’ve mentioned it up above in the post. 🙂

  4. says

    Thanks again for mentioning the frittata! 🙂 Here’s my contribution for this week:

    Emily @ Life in Cincinnati Homemade Ranch Seasoning Mix (http://lifeincincinnati.com/?p=1901)
    Save money and avoid preservatives & chemicals (no MSG either!) by making your own ranch mix. This makes a delicious veggie dip that tastes just like Hidden Valley, perhaps even a little better!

  5. Heather says

    Michele – I too made refried beans in the crockpot and loved the taste of them much better than the canned version. We like black beans and I used some homemade chicken stock to cook them in, so I received the added benefit of the stock. I made enough for 3 meals – one we ate right away and the other 2 I froze.

Trackbacks

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