Converting Recipes: Soaked Wild Rice Pancakes


In my post about soaking your grains or flours, I have been getting some questions in regard to how this works. I definitely recommend looking into buying Nourishing Traditions because all of her grain recipes are soaked. But you shouldn’t feel limited to just using Sally Fallon’s recipes. It’s quite easy to convert most recipes.

For an example, I wanted to show you how I converted Heidi Swanson’s Wild Rice Pancake recipe to be a soaked recipe. I thought that this recipe was very interesting. The wild rice gave it grassy undertones that brought a more savory aspect to the pancakes. (By the way, some other blogger’s introduced me to Heidi, and I love her creativity! She also has a very nice vegetarian cookbook called Super Natural Cooking from which this recipe was adapted. Check out both her blog and her book. You will be inspired by her creative use of grains and ingredients).

So, she has you make the pancakes the traditional way, mixing it up right before cooking. Using her measurements, this is how I converted it.

Wild Rice Flour Pancakes, by Heidi Swanson

The night before place in a glass or ceramic bowl:

1 1/2 cups of whole-wheat pastry flour
1/2 cup of wild rice flour (I ground it in my grain grinder, you can also just use a spice or coffee grinder)
2 1/4 cups of buttermilk

Mix until all flour pockets are gone. Cover and leave on the counter overnight (how easy is that!) In the morning, add in everything except the cooked wild rice:

2 tablespoons melted butter

1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/3 cup of natural can sugar
1/2 teaspoon of fine-grain salt
2 large eggs. lightly beaten
1 cup of cooked wild rice (optional)

Mix in everything, except the cooked wild rice, until ingredients are just combined. The flour/buttermilk mixture can have a slightly different texture as you mix, but it turns out great! Sometimes I have found that if I thin the batter a little with water, I have an easier time getting it to cook all the way through.

Heat skillet or griddle until medium-hot, brush with a bit more butter, and test the temperature. If the drop of water dances across the surface, you’re in the ballpark. Sprinkle a tablespoon of the precooked wild rice in the pan and pour 1/3 cup of batter on top of the rice. Cook until the bottom is deep golden in color, about 3 minutes, then flip with a spatula and cook the other side until golden and cooked through. Repeat with the remaining batter.

Serve with your choice of syrup and butter.

My only other note for success is to point out that sometimes soaked pancakes needs a little lower heat (to cook slower and longer) to cook all the way through. So keep that in mind as you cook these up. But, as you can see, it’s really not hard to convert simple recipes like this one!

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I love beautiful and simple food that is nourishing to the body and the soul. I wrote Fresh: Nourishing Salads for All Seasons and Ladled: Nourishing Soups for All Seasons as another outlet of sharing this love of mine. I also love sharing practical tips on how to make a real food diet work on a real life budget. Find me online elsewhere by clicking on the icons below!

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Comments

  1. Toni says

    Hi!Thanks for this post.I am adding yyour blog to my list of blogs I visit.I plan on reading more.I`m trying to establish heathier ways of eating.These pancakes look very good!

  2. Mrs. U says

    Oh YUM! This sounds like something my family would LOVE!!! I’ll bet that adding the little bit of rice when you are making the pancakes has a very nice taste!!!

    His,
    Mrs. U

  3. Kirstin says

    These sound good Kimi. My youngest loves pancakes but I haven’t found a healthy version of a pancake mix that she really likes…ones that basically taste like the buttermilk pancake mixes. I know we won’t find an exact replica, but any suggestions for something that is close, yet healthy?

    I suppose if I even just made it myself it’d be healthier because it wouldn’t have all the extra preservatives in it..

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